“Spirit from the Other Side” by Michele Chapin, Italian Alabaster on Mexican Marble, 2008, Collection of the artst.
“Spirit from the Other Side” by Michele Chapin, Italian Alabaster on Mexican Marble, 2008, Collection of the artst.
Enlarge Photo
Opens March 23 at the Santa Paula Art Museum

SANTA PAULA, CA – “Old Hands, New Works”, opening March 23, 2013 at the Santa Paula Art Museum, is an exhibition shared between long-established Ventura County artists Michele Chapin and Susan Petty. Their latest works reflect strikingly new approaches and motivations brought to form by expert hands. An opening reception will be held Saturday, March 23 from 4 to 6 p.m. Admission to the reception is $10 for SPAM members and $15 for non-members. The exhibit runs through July 14, 2013.

“Michele Chapin’s most recent body of work is as refreshing and rare as her spirit,” says Museum Director Jennifer Heighton. An award-winning stone sculptor, teacher and community arts activist, Chapin works out of her open air “Stoneworks Studio” in Ventura. Her inspiration comes from found organic objects such as shells, flowers, bones, the figure, and Mysticism. Michele’s sculptures are captivating in color and sensual in form. Several of her latest pieces were carved by pushing a piece of stone past what is structurally possible. This aggressive working of the stone created a new variety of shapes unlike anything she has done before.

Fans of painter Susan Petty will also be pleasantly surprised by the new direction that her work has taken. As Susan put it, “the work in this show has come about as a meeting of life and art.” With photographer Bill Dewey’s “Waves” series as her muse, Petty used the chaos and motion of waves as metaphors for changes in her own life. Each artwork is an expression of a different emotion. And while Petty’s new drawings and paintings are quite distinct from her previous works, her art is as breathtaking as it has always been. Together, Chapin and Petty demonstrate that “old hands” and life experience can produce truly innovative art.

Reservations for the opening reception are recommended. Please contact the Museum at (805) 525-5554, or email info@santapaulaartmuseum.org. The Museum is located at 117 North 10th Street, Santa Paula, CA 93060. The Museum’s regular hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 10 AM – 4 PM, and Sundays, 12 PM – 4 PM.

Publicity Images: “Spirit from the Other Side” by Michele Chapin, Italian Alabaster on Mexican Marble, 2008, Collection of the artst; “Untitled” by Susan Petty, oil on canvas, 2013, Collection of the artist.

 


 
Cultivating Oxnard Sugar Beets; MVC Research Library Collection
Cultivating Oxnard Sugar Beets; MVC Research Library Collection
Enlarge Photo

The Museum of Ventura County’s Agriculture Museum will be showcasing a new exhibit, From Field to Factory, Oxnard’s Beet Generation, from March 30 to August 11, 2013. The exhibit will include never-before-exhibited photographs of the American Beet Sugar Factory in Oxnard, which was the world’s second largest beet sugar producer upon completion in 1898, and tales of the boom town that sprang up practically overnight around the factory. The photographs illustrate the rise of one of Ventura County’s most important historical crops: Sugar beets. A beet wagon fully-restored by Santa Paula resident, Richard Cummings, will be on display. Artifacts from the factory, as well as tools from of the beet trade, will also be on display.

Visitors are invited to attend the opening reception on Saturday, April 6, from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m, which will celebrate two exhibits, From Field to Factory and Farm Fresh Quilts. Event will include sweet treats, no-host bar, and beet-related contests. Admission to the reception is $5.00 for the general public and free for museum members. RSVP to 805-525-3100.

Along with the opening reception, the Agriculture Museum will host several events focused on the sugar beet industry. On Sunday, April 14, at 2:00 p.m., CSU Channel Islands Professor of History, Frank P. Barajas, Ph.D., will present Oxnard Labor History. Barajas is the author of Curious Unions: Mexican American Workers and Resistance in Oxnard, California, 1898-1961. Admission to Barajas’ lecture is $5.00 for the general public and free for museum members, and includes entrance to all Museum exhibits. RSVP to 805-525-3100.

The Museum of Ventura County’s Agriculture Museum is located in historic downtown Santa Paula at 926 Railroad Avenue, Santa Paula, California. Hours are 10 a.m.– 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. General admission is $4 adults, $3 seniors, $1 children ages 6-17. Free for Museum of Ventura County members and children ages 5 and younger. Paid events include free admission to the galleries, and the first Sunday of every month is free general admission to the public. For more information, go to www.venturamuseum.org or call (805) 525-3100.

 


 
Program features music from Colorado performances

THOUSAND OAKS, CA - After completing a weeklong performance tour of Colorado, the California Lutheran University Choir will present a concert on campus in Samuelson Chapel at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 2.

The CLU Women’s Chorale will join the choir for the annual Home Concert.

The varied program will feature works performed during seven Colorado concerts. One featured work is “Magnificat,” which was composed by Englishman Ralph Vaughan Williams for chorus, piano, flute and mezzo-soprano solo. Senior music major Susannah Ruth of Thousand Oaks will be the soloist. Another is “O Magnum Mysterium,” a multimedia work written by U.S. composer Libby Larsen for chorus and pre-recorded seven-track solo voice with sitar, vibraphone and bells, and laptop computer.

The concert will include works by contemporary composers Javier Busto, Ola Gjeilo and Kenneth Jennings and music for choir and saxophone featuring musician Nicole Hovland of Canyon Country. As always, the program will conclude with folk songs, spirituals and gospel songs.

Wyant Morton, chair of the Music Department, will conduct the 50-voice choir.

Founded in 1961, the CLU Choir is the university’s premiere choral ensemble. It has toured throughout the United States and in England, Italy, Norway and Sweden. It has performed at St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome and at Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall in New York City. The choir has earned a reputation for its commitment to performing the finest in choral literature from all eras in the original languages. While dedicated to performing works that represent the university’s Lutheran heritage, the choir also embraces innovative new music and multicultural pieces.

The chapel is located south of Olsen Road near Campus Drive on the Thousand Oaks campus.

Donations will be accepted. For more information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit callutheran.edu.

 


 
Trip to the Farmers’ Market, Jan Inouye
Trip to the Farmers’ Market, Jan Inouye
Enlarge Photo

A collection of contemporary quilts inspired by fresh fruits, vegetables, flowers, farms, and farmers will be featured in a new exhibit called Farm Fresh Quilts. Exhibit will be on display at the Museum of Ventura County’s Agriculture Museum from March 30 to June 16, 2013. Exhibit includes 20 one-of-a-kind pieces, contributed by 15 quilters from Ventura and Santa Barbara counties. Visitors who attend the opening reception for Farm Fresh Quilts, on Saturday, April 6, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m., can also see the Agriculture Museum’s new sugar beet exhibit, From Field to Factory: Oxnard’s Beet Generation. Admission to the reception is $5.00 for the general public, free for museum members. Event includes sweet treats and a no-host bar. RSVP to 805-525-3100.

Along with the opening reception, the Agriculture Museum will host several events focused on quilting. Quilter Pat Masterson will host a Second Thursday Gallery Talk called Ag-Inspired Quilts, on April 11 at 2:00 p.m. Masterson will talk about the varieties of creative expression and quilting techniques employed in the 20 original quilts on display. General admission is charged for Second Thursday Gallery Talks and museum members are free. No reservations are required.

Children are encouraged to learn about quilting and enjoy the exhibit during our Free First Sunday activity on June 2, from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. During Quilt Blocks for Kids!, volunteers will help children work with paper, fabric, and art supplies to create colorful quilt blocks. Participants will learn about geometric shapes and colors as they create pieces they can take home. A colorful handmade quilt of California scenes will be on display so children can add their own quilting stitches with a needle and thread.

The Museum of Ventura County’s Agriculture Museum is located in historic downtown Santa Paula, at 926 Railroad Avenue, Santa Paula, California. Hours are 10 a.m.– 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. General admission is $4 adults, $3 seniors, $1 children ages 6-17. Free for Museum of Ventura County members and children ages 5 and younger. Paid events include free admission to the galleries, and the first Sunday of every month is free general admission to the public. For more information, go to www.venturamuseum.org or call (805) 525-3100.

 


 
Community events to include poetry slam, photo and art exhibits

Camarillo, CA - CSU Channel Islands (CI) invites the public to join in a weeklong celebration honoring the late labor leader and civil rights activist César Chávez. A series of events are planned on the CI campus and at Café on A in Oxnard throughout the week of March 25, leading up to César Chávez Day on the 31st.

The events are intended to engage students, faculty, staff and community members in a shared celebration of Chávez’s life, legacy and core values. Throughout the week, CI students will also participate in activities promoting service, advocacy and volunteerism.

A detailed listing of free, public events is provided below.

César E. Chávez: A Legacy of Service: Photo and Art Exhibit Opening and Reception

Wednesday, March 27, 5 - 7:30 p.m., John Spoor Broome Library, CI campus

Join us for the debut of two exhibits that pay powerful tribute to the memory of César Chávez. Photojournalist Jess Gutierrez has captured the spirit of Ventura County farmworker communities for over three decades. Artist Xico González honors labor leaders of the United Farm Workers movement in celebration of the 50th Anniversary. The event will include a 6 p.m. panel discussion moderated by Dolores Huerta, co-founder of the United Farm Workers (UFW) union with César Chávez. A reception will follow at 7 p.m. Limited complimentary campus parking will be available. Follow signs to event parking. Please RSVP to the exhibit opening at: https://csuci.wufoo.com/forms/r6r2q7/. For more information, contact Dr. Frank Barajas at frank.barajas@csuci.edu.

Revoltoso: The Art of Xico González

Thursday, March 28, 7 p.m., Café on A, 438 South A Street, Oxnard

Brash, evocative, and never shy, Xico González's "Revoltoso" features silkscreen posters created in support of numerous political causes, but mainly the fight for immigrants' rights. His art overturns conventional thought and popular images to make his audience react in visceral ways. An activist/organizer as well as an artist, González uses his artistic skills to benefit his community and contribute to the long dialogue of art, activism and the legacy of the Chicano Art Movement.

Rhyme for a Reason II: Social Justice Poetry Slam

Thursday, March 28, 8 p.m., Café on A, 438 South A Street, Oxnard

Nationally recognized, award-winning Chicano poet, author and playwright Paul Flores is coming to Oxnard to speak his rhyme. A past performer on HBO’s Def Poetry Jams, Flores weaves spoken word, theater and hip-hop around issues of social justice.

This weeklong celebration is made possible by CI’s Centers for Community and Multicultural Engagement; the Chicana/o Studies, Communication, and History programs; the John Spoor Broome Library; Project ISLAS; Instructionally Related Activities funds; Laborers' International Union of North America-LIUNA-Local 585, Ventura; Cabo Seafood Grill & Cantina; Xavier Montes; and Marie Gregorio-Oviedo.

For more information, please contact Pilar Pacheco, Associate Director, Center for Community Engagement, at pilar.pacheco@csuci.edu or 805-437-8851.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is celebrating 10 years of education, innovation, growth and community enrichment during the 2012/2013 academic year. We salute our faculty, staff, students, alumni, supporters, and partners who continue the CI mission of a student-centered education emphasizing international and multicultural perspectives with interdisciplinary and experiential service-oriented learning.

Together, we are solving the problems of today, preparing the leaders and innovators of tomorrow, and contributing to the vitality of higher education.

CSU Channel Islands – A Decade of Distinction

 

California State Old Time Fiddlers District 8 will meet Sunday, March 10 and 24, 2013 from 1:30-4:30pm at the Oak View Community Center, 18 Valley Road, Oak View. Join fiddlers for an afternoon of listening and dancing to Country Western and Bluegrass music. No admission or parking charge. Refreshments available. For more information and to find out about upcoming workshops go to calfiddlers.com or call 805-797-6563.

 

Bring the children down to the Agriculture Museum in Santa Paula for a toy farm-animal themed scavenger hunt. Event takes place from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Sunday, April 7, 2013. Participants will be challenged with clues leading to each animal’s location. Every child who participates will be given a small complimentary prize, and winners will be eligible for either a grand prize or entry in opportunity drawings. Museum volunteers will be available to help young visitors join the fun.

The scavenger hunt is part of the Museum’s ongoing series to encourage agricultural awareness, Free First Sundays. These events take place every first Sunday of the month and include free admission to the general public for all exhibits and events.

The Museum of Ventura County’s Agriculture Museum is located in historic downtown Santa Paula, California at 926 Railroad Avenue. Hours are 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. General admission is $4 adults, $3 seniors, $1 children ages 6-17. Free for Museum of Ventura County members and children ages 5 and younger. Paid events include free admission to the galleries, and the first Sunday of every month is free general admission to the public. For more information, go to www.venturamuseum.org or call (805) 525-3100.

 
Photograph by Kevin Wynn
Photograph by Kevin Wynn
Enlarge Photo
Photograph by Kevin Wynn
Photograph by Kevin Wynn
Enlarge Photo
Photograph by Kevin Wynn
Photograph by Kevin Wynn
Enlarge Photo
Photograph by Kevin Wynn
Photograph by Kevin Wynn
Enlarge Photo
Photograph by Kevin Wynn
Photograph by Kevin Wynn
Enlarge Photo
Photograph by Kevin Wynn
Photograph by Kevin Wynn
Enlarge Photo

Kevin Wynn, Ojai wedding and portrait photographer, will present “Portraits – From Headshots to Environmental Portraits” at the March 19 meeting of the Ojai Photography Club. Wynn will discuss lighting, lens selection, angles, composition and communication.

Wynn is an international award-winning photographer and travels from coast to coast for destination weddings and portrait clients. He is based in Ojai where he lives with his wife and two kids. He describes his work as stylized portraiture. In his words, “I love how a photograph can bring out so much emotion in people. A split second frozen in time can make us laugh, cry, fall in love again.” To see examples of his stunning, timeless and elegant photography visit: http://kevinwynn.com/

The public is invited to this free presentation. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m., at Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 Santa Ana St., Ojai, CA. For additional information on the Ojai Photography Club visit: http://www.ojaiphotoclub.com/

 
Terrestrial, photograph by Amy Oliver
Terrestrial, photograph by Amy Oliver
Enlarge Photo

A window seat, discerning eye and digital camera turned into a five-year project for Amy Oliver culminating in “Terrestrial,” her solo exhibition March 26-April 20 at Buenaventura Art Association’s downtown Ventura gallery.

Landscape and documentary photography are Oliver’s passions and she said this grouping represents 32 airliner trips over the years to visit friends and family members. She will have two-dozen works in the show, all 12-inch-square images printed on watercolor paper using archival pigments (framed to 18 inches square).

“I decided to print this size because I want the viewer to come close to each piece to have a more intimate experience with the work,” said Oliver, whose other aerial series include clouds and skies, titled Gray and Blue. Examples can be found at www.amyoliver.net.

An opening reception is planned 4-7 p.m. March 30, at which she promises “some delicious beer” brewed especially for the occasion by husband Jared Bishop, “a wonderful home brewer.” Oliver also plans to talk about her work from 7-8 p.m. April 5 during the First Friday Gallery Crawl, which runs from 5-8 p.m. A print of her work will be raffled off that night with name drawing at 7:45p.m.

The Ventura photographer and photography teacher got her start in North Carolina, she said, enrolling with her mother in a North Carolina community college class during a summer break from high school in 1996. “I can see elements of my work from that very first class that continue today,” she said. Oliver earned a Master of Fine Arts degree in photography in 2007 at California Institute for the Arts and has taught the subject at community colleges in Pasadena, Los Angeles and Ventura.

Major art influences include legendary lensmen William Eggleston, Walker Evans and Henri Cartier-Bresson and other image makers, including 18th-century Japanese printmaker Hokousai and American painters Wayne Thiebaud and Mark Rothko. “My friends, colleagues and students also inspire me all the time,” she added.

“Photographs are always specific … taken at a particular place at a particular time of a particular subject. When we see photographs, we expect to know these details,” Oliver said. “I believe these details can take us out of our experience with the image itself. I wondered, how could I make a photograph feel like a Mark Rothko painting?

“To do this, I work to create photographs that are timeless and placeless so the mind can wander, open up and experience the image. I aim to inspire wonder in my audience as well as a sense of peace and a quietness of mind,” she said. “The airplane proved to be the perfect place to create these sorts of images.”

“Terrestrial” will showcase those peaceful images at the Buenaventura Gallery, 700 E. Santa Clara St., which is open noon-5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays. For more information, visit the nonprofit BAA’s website at www.buenaventuragallery.org.

 

Camarillo, CA - The CSU Channel Islands (CI) Art Program is pleased to announce an exhibition of new paintings by Los Angeles artist Kerry Kugelman. “Trackless: New Paintings” runs through Friday, April 5, in the Art Gallery at Napa Hall on the CI campus. A closing reception will be held Saturday, March 30, from 1 to 4 p.m.

With his latest exhibition of abstract paintings, Kugelman continues his exploration of atmosphere, light and color. Employing a broad palette, this new body of work teems with forms and textures that evoke a sense of mystery and wonder. Using acrylic mediums, ink and charcoal applied in multiple layers, Kugelman’s paintings have rich, glossy surfaces, abstract details and patterns. Very little of this work is painted with a brush, but is instead poured, splashed, scraped and sanded, creating floating worlds of light and color. “Trackless,” the show’s title, alludes to a place where there are no established routes or ways to go, creating the need to choose our own path.

Kerry Kugelman’s paintings have been exhibited throughout Southern California and are in numerous private collections. His writing has appeared in several local art publications, and he has also taught at universities and colleges throughout the Los Angeles area and the Inland Empire, including at CI.

The Art Gallery at Napa Hall is located on Ventura Street on the CI campus. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Limited parking is available on campus with the purchase of a $6 daily permit; follow signs to the parking permit dispensers. Free parking is available at the Camarillo Metrolink Station/Lewis Road with bus service to and from the campus. Riders should board the CI Vista Bus to the campus; the cash-only fare is $1.25 each way. Buses arrive and depart from the Camarillo Metrolink Station every 30 minutes from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday. For exact times, check the schedule at www.goventura.org.

For additional information, contact the CI Art Program at 805-437-8570, email art@csuci.edu, or visit http://art.csuci.edu/gallery. To learn more about the artist, visit http://kerrykugelman.com/.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is celebrating 10 years of education, innovation, growth and community enrichment during the 2012/2013 academic year. We salute our faculty, staff, students, alumni, supporters, and partners who continue the CI mission of a student-centered education emphasizing international and multicultural perspectives with interdisciplinary and experiential service-oriented learning.

Together, we are solving the problems of today, preparing the leaders and innovators of tomorrow, and contributing to the vitality of higher education.

CSU Channel Islands – A Decade of Distinction

 
Buzz on the Moon
Buzz on the Moon
Enlarge Photo
March 31 to June 24, 2013

Who: The California Oil Museum

What: Exhibit, “Let’s Go to the Moon! The Lunar Missions”

Where: 1001 E. Main Street, Santa Paula, CA

When: APRIL 7 to JUNE 24, 2013

Why: The Moon is so important to us in many ways- come and find out why!

We know more about many aspects of the Moon than we know about any world beyond our own, and yet we have barely begun to solve its countless mysteries. In the decades since the last Apollo landing on the Moon in 1972, there has been a widespread misperception that the Moon has already told us all the important things that it has to tell, that scientifically it is a “been there, done that” world. Nothing could be farther from the truth.
Let’s Go to the Moon is an over view of the past lunar missions, current missions, geology and future missions. This exhibit was created by the staff at the California Oil Museum with help from NASA and JPL . Photos, text and 3-demensional items will be on display along with videos of actual footage of the lunar surface. Student workshops “On the Moon” are available. Museum hours Wed – Sun, 10am to 4pm. Admission is $4 Adults, $3 Seniors, $1 Students, 5 years old and younger are free. Members are free. Call 805-933-0076 or email jorcutt@spcity.org for more information or go to our website at www.oilmuseum.net. Speakers from NASA and JPL will be announced.

Why is the moon important?

The Moon is, above all, a witness to 4.5 billion years of solar system history, and it has recorded that history more completely and more clearly than has any other planetary body. Nowhere else can we see back with such clarity to the time when Earth and the other terrestrial planets—Mercury, Venus, and Mars—were formed and life emerged on Earth.

Planetary scientists have long understood the Moon’s unique significance as the starting point in the continuum of the evolution of rocky worlds. Many of the processes that have modified the terrestrial planets have been absent on the Moon. The lunar interior retains a record of the initial stages of planetary evolution. Its crust has never been altered by plate tectonics, which continually recycle Earth’s crust; or by planet wide volcanism, which resurfaced Venus only half a billion years ago; or by the action of wind and water, which have transformed the surfaces of both Earth and Mars. The Moon today presents a record of geologic processes of early planetary evolution in the purest form. Its airless surface also provides a continuous record of solar-terrestrial processes.

For these reasons, the Moon is priceless to planetary scientists: It remains a cornerstone for deciphering the histories of those more complex worlds. But because of the limitations of current samples and data derived from them, researchers cannot be sure that they have read these histories correctly. Now, thanks to the legacy of the Apollo program, it is possible to pose sophisticated questions that are more relevant and focused than those that could be asked more than three decades ago. Only by returning to the Moon to carry out new scientific explorations can we hope to close the gaps in understanding and learn the secrets that the Moon alone has kept for eons.

 
Detail 1884 Crazy Quilt, Photographer Myrna Cambianica
Detail 1884 Crazy Quilt, Photographer Myrna Cambianica
Enlarge Photo
Detail from Artist Leslie Wongmo’s Six Supports, Photographer Myrna Cambianica
Detail from Artist Leslie Wongmo’s Six Supports, Photographer Myrna Cambianica
Enlarge Photo
Gallery Detail: Linda Taylor dress and tapestry by John Nava. Photographer Roger Conrad
Gallery Detail: Linda Taylor dress and tapestry by John Nava. Photographer Roger Conrad
Enlarge Photo
Detail Dress by Artist Linda Taylor. Photographer Myrna Cambianica
Detail Dress by Artist Linda Taylor. Photographer Myrna Cambianica
Enlarge Photo
Visitors Viewing 1884 Haggerty Crazy Quilt. Photographer Myrna Cambianica
Visitors Viewing 1884 Haggerty Crazy Quilt. Photographer Myrna Cambianica
Enlarge Photo
Visitors Viewing Artist Gerri McMillins “Zooid” Basketry. Photographer Myrna Cambianica
Visitors Viewing Artist Gerri McMillins “Zooid” Basketry. Photographer Myrna Cambianica
Enlarge Photo
Two visitors viewing the Linda Taylor dress. Photographer Les Dublin
Two visitors viewing the Linda Taylor dress. Photographer Les Dublin
Enlarge Photo
Gallery View of Fiber Art Master Pieces Exhibit. Photographer Roger Conrad
Gallery View of Fiber Art Master Pieces Exhibit. Photographer Roger Conrad
Enlarge Photo

It’s easy to guess what’s going on inside the Ojai Valley Museum just by glancing at the outside entrance in relation to the banners in the courtyard corners. The Yarn Bombers of Ojai - otherwise known as the Naughty ‘Nitters or Guerilla Grannies - arrived surreptitiously on the night of January 31st and installed a riot of crocheted street art. Yarn bombing, or yarnstorming, is a spontaneous international movement of secretive and anonymous fiber artists. They represent the “outsider art” component of the current exhibit at the museum, “Fiber Art Master Pieces,” which runs through March 31, 2013. The yarn party outside celebrates the occasion.

Michele Pracy, Museum Director and curator/designer of the exhibit, had two main criteria in selecting the pieces: “First, each piece must be art, then it must be made of fiber in a masterful technique.” Over 150 years of local fiber arts are represented, from wearable art to soft sculpture, from 19th century quilts to a 21st century large scale tapestry. Pracy has woven a fabric of visual relationships in the exhibit. Her placement of modern fabric art side by side with century-old quilts illuminates the beauty and finesse of each. Her wall texts guide the visitor seamlessly through centuries of technique and innovation.

The multiple levels of meaning in the exhibit have to be experienced in person, as there is so much content beyond the visual image. The deepest level is primal, related to the need to survive and to soften the impact of the elements on the human body. Our earliest memories recall the texture of a blanket or sweater. So intimate is this connection that touching the works in the exhibit is an almost irresistible urge - but alas, next to each piece a “Do Not Touch” sign is posted. Curator Pracy explains that the oils in our fingers, although invisible to us, can irreparably damage the fabrics.

Another level of meaning is the human need for beauty beyond the practical usefulness of an object. Two “crazy” quilts in the exhibit, on loan from the Thacher and Haggerty families of Ojai, lavishly emphasize beauty over utility. Until the rise of abstract art in the middle of the 20th century, quilts were not taken seriously - after all, they were created by anonymous women in the home rather than in the studios of famous artists with wealthy patrons. But the abstract movement sharpened our eyes and we can now appreciate the mastery of color and design in these amazing fabric artworks. They have what Pracy calls a “push-pull” effect on the visitor. We step back to see the unity of vibrating shapes and saturated colors, and then the intricate web of stitching and patchwork pulls us back in. The quilt maker must hold the seams together with exterior stitches, and she turns this necessity into design. Lines of silk thread flow like phrases of music, forming one surprising shape after another. Closer examination also reveals pictorial elements sewn into the abstract shapes. Look for the spider in the Haggerty quilt: it’s a symbol of the fabric skills of the quilter, and included for good luck!

The human need for inspiration has been met in the Western world most often by painting and sculpture. But in Tibet, the fabric arts provide the greatest fulfillment of this need. Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo is a master of the Tibetan thangka, a sacred image created from pieces of hand-loomed silk. Although sometimes referred to as appliqué, a thangka is really a kind of fabric mosaic, stitched with horsehair cords. Rinchen-Wongmo learned this exacting art directly from masters in the Tibetan exile community of Dharamsala, India. She explains, however, that the concept of mastership is different there: the emphasis is on the art itself, rather than on the personality of the individual artist. Tibetan workshops create “master thangkas, not master thangka artists.” This is a deeply tactile art, carrying the touch of the human hand in every thread. The beauty and sensuality of the silk, combined with images of enlightened beings, are designed to draw the viewer closer to the thangka and to encourage spiritual life. The thangka invites and opens up like a flower as one comes closer.

The need to experiment and express contemporary consciousness is now being met by the wide range of possibilities found in the fiber arts. Since the middle of the 20th century, artists have ventured into unconventional fibers, multiple layers, and mixed media. Carolyn Ryan’s work uses all of these techniques to create a haunting sense of the isolation people often experience in modern society. In her hands, fabric and thread transform into tactile poetry. Puckered cloth, heavy stitching, superimposed monoprints - all become metaphors of an indefinable loneliness. Gerri McMillin reveals an underwater world of “Zooids,” woven out of screen wire and crochet. These seemingly incompatible elements create a startlingly original cross between a basket and a sea creature. Another unexpected fiber in the exhibit is translucent Japanese paper. Linda Taylor’s lipstick-pink paper dress is layered in monoprints symbolizing cultural expectations of beauty in women from the Renaissance to Hollywood.

The 40 pieces in the Ojai Valley Museum’s “Fiber Art Master Pieces” engage the visitor at multiple levels, in a way that painting and sculpture cannot quite fulfill. A painting may be beautiful, but can you take it off the wall and wrap it around yourself on a freezing night? Fiber art involves the whole human being, grounding us as it inspires, delights, and challenges.

A special thanks is extended to Ojai Community Bank, sponsor of “Fiber Art Master Pieces.”
The museum is located at 130 W. Ojai Avenue, Ojai, CA. Admission: free for current 2013 members, adults - $4.00, children 6–18 - $1.00 and children 5 and under – free. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Tours are available by appointment. Free parking is available off Blanche Street at back of museum.

For more information, call the museum at (805) 640-1390, ext. 203, e-mail ojaimuseum@sbcglobal.net or visit the museum website at: Ojai Valley Museum.org
Find us on Facebook Ojai Valley Museum

The Ojai Valley Museum, established in 1967, is generously supported in part by museum members, private donors, business sponsors and underwriters, the Smith-Hobson Foundation, Wood-Claeyssens Foundation, City of Ojai, Rotary Club of Ojai, and the Ojai Civic Association.

 

Entries are now being accepted for the annual County Ventura St. Patrick’s Day Parade which will march down Main Street in downtown Ventura for the 24rd time on St. Patrick’s Day, Saturday, March 17 at 10 a.m. Presented by the Ventura Elks Lodge 1430, the parade with some 100 entries begins at the San Buenaventura Mission on Main Street in Downtown Ventura and moves east past the reviewing stand at Chestnut Street and on to the end at Fir Street.

The parade's them is “Everyone’s Irish on St. Patrick’s Day”

Parade entries are being accepted until March 8. Parade organizers invite businesses, bands, dancers, acrobats, clowns, horses and organizations to participate in the county’s greenest event! Entry forms can be downloaded from the Parade’s website,www.venturastpatricksdayparade.com or obtained by calling Jim Monahan, Parade Co-Chairman at 643-4275.

Sponsors for the 2013 parade include Rabobank, Agromin, Dargan's Irish Pub, Georgino Development, Wells Fargo Bank, Ventura County Credit Unit, CSUCI, Crowne Plaza, Slaughter & Reagan and Limoneira.

 
Contemporary decorated eggs by artist/photographer Bernadette DiPietro
Contemporary decorated eggs by artist/photographer Bernadette DiPietro
Enlarge Photo
Adult Art Class Co-sponsored by Ojai Valley Museum
Ukrainian traditional decorated eggs from artist/photographer Bernadette DiPietro's private collection
Ukrainian traditional decorated eggs from artist/photographer Bernadette DiPietro's private collection
Enlarge Photo

The Ojai Valley Museum is offering a new, annual series of Adult Art Classes beginning in February 2013. Collaborating with Ojai artist, Bernadette DiPietro, and using her Blanche Street, “WORKING Artist Gallery” space as an adjunct classroom, the museum is able to offer this new enrichment/educational program to the public.

The March 9th class, “Ukrainian Egg Decoration,” is scheduled to coincide with the Easter Holiday. For nearly 2,000 years people from all over the world have been decorating eggs in the spring of the year. Each year with the first of spring, Ukrainians’ begin creating their collection of Pysanky eggs. The symbolic designs represent a meaning to both the designer of the egg and the person who receives them. They are believed to contain special powers. Participants in the workshop will decorate in the traditional manner, combining the legends, customs, symbols, and designs of Ukrainian Pysanky eggs.

The fee for this all day workshop is $175.00 with a $30.00 materials fee, which includes all supplies, registration and your own set of tools to take home after the class. Early registration is recommended since each workshop is limited to 8 participants. The Ojai Valley Museum will e-mail a detailed description of the class, with applicable fees, just call (805) 640-1390, ext. 203. Or access the museum facebook page via our website at: www.ojaivalleymuseum.org.

Pre-registration of at least one week in advance of the workshop date is preferred. Space is limited to 8 students per class. All registration is taken through the museum by calling the above number.

The Ojai Valley Museum, established in 1967, is generously supported in part by Museum Members, Private Donors, Business Sponsors and Underwriters, the Smith-Hobson Foundation, Wood-Claeyssens Foundation, City of Ojai, Rotary Club of Ojai, and the Ojai Civic Association.

The museum is located at 130 W. Ojai Avenue, Ojai, CA. Admission: free for current 2012 members, adults - $4.00, children 6–18 - $1.00 and children 5 and under – free. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m; Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Tours are available by appointment. Free parking is available off Blanche Street at back of museum.

 
Author studies effect of crime policies on urban youth
Victor Rios
Victor Rios

THOUSAND OAKS, CA - A gang member-turned-college professor will speak at California Lutheran University on Tuesday, March 19.

Victor Rios, an associate professor of sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, will discuss his experiences growing up on the streets of Oakland and present his research on juvenile justice, masculinity, race and crime at 7 p.m. in the Lundring Events Center.

Rios’ most recent book, “Punished: Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys,” is based on three years of field research and in-depth interviews with young men in Oakland. The 2011 book analyzes how juvenile crime policies and criminalization affect the everyday lives of urban youth. “Punished” is required reading in Molly George’s criminal justice research methods course at CLU.

Rios came to the United States with his mother when he was 2 and grew up in some of the worst projects of Oakland. He dropped out of school for the first time in eighth grade and joined a neighborhood gang for protection at 14, often living in stolen cars for months at a time. The turning point came at 15 when he saw a friend and fellow gang member murdered in a gunfight with rivals.

With help from a teacher who believed in him and a police officer who gave him a second chance, Rios graduated on time with his high school class. He went on to college and eventually earned a doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley.

How Rios, now 35, was able to escape life on the streets and earn a doctorate is one of the narratives in “Punished.” Another is his account of the dissertation research that took him back to the neighborhoods where he grew up.

Rios, who runs a Santa Barbara program for at-risk adolescents, has received many honors including the 2010 New Scholar Award from the American Society of Criminology. “Punished” received the American Sociological Association’s 2012 Latino/a Sociology Section Best Book Award. Rios’ first book, “Street Life: Poverty, Gangs, and a Ph.D.,” was published five months before “Punished.”

Lundring Events Center is located in the Gilbert Sports and Fitness Center north of Olsen Road on the Thousand Oaks campus.

CLU’s Center for Equality and Justice, Multicultural Programs and International Student Services, Campus Diversity Initiative, ASCLU-G Student Government and departments of communication, criminal justice, languages and cultures, political science, psychology, religion, sociology, educational leadership, and counseling andguidance are sponsoring the free public event. For more information, contact the CEJ at cej@callutheran.edu or 805-493-3694 or Molly George at 805-493-3437.

 
 
Woodwind groups to perform David Maslanka works

THOUSAND OAKS, CA - Highly acclaimed U.S. composer David Maslanka will be the guest of honor at the 11th Annual New Music Concert on Saturday, March 16, in California Lutheran University’s Samuelson Chapel.

Maslanka, whose compositions have been performed extensively throughout the United States and the world, will be present for the 7:30 p.m. concert of his music.

The CLU Woodwind Ensemble directed by Michael Hart will perform “Mother Earth” and “Traveler.” The faculty Woodwind Quintet with Nancy Marfisi on flute, Dan Geeting on clarinet, Fred Beerstein on oboe, Eric Johnson-Tamai on bassoon and Louise MacGillivray on horn will perform “Quintet for Winds No. 2.”

Maslanka’s works for wind and percussion have become standard repertoire for wind band and percussion ensembles. The versatile composer has published more than 100 pieces in a variety of genres including nine symphonies, a Mass, nine concerti and a wide variety of chamber works. His work has been characterized as a blend of lyricism and intense rhythmic drive notable for its poetry, warmth and spiritual qualities.

The composer has received five residence fellowships from the MacDowell Colony in New Hampshire as well as multiple grants. He has been honored with the National Endowment for the Arts Composer Award three times and, in 1999, was awarded the National Symphony Orchestra regional composer-in-residence award. He has served as a guest composer formore than 100 universities, music festivals and conferences.

Maslanka received his bachelor’s degree in music from the Oberlin Conservatory. He then spent a year at the Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria, and earned a master’s degree and doctorate in music theory and composition at Michigan State University. He served on the faculty at New York University, Sarah Lawrence College, State University of New York at Geneseo and Kingsborough Community College of the City University of New York. Since 1990 he has been a freelance composer living in Missoula, Mont.

The chapel is located off of Campus Drive south of Olsen Road on the Thousand Oaks campus.

Donations will be accepted. For more information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit http://www.callutheran.edu/music.

 
Gary Saderup as Abraham Lincoln
Gary Saderup as Abraham Lincoln
Enlarge Photo
Event will include discussion with actor, professor

THOUSAND OAKS, CA - California Lutheran University will screen an Abraham Lincoln movie and present a discussion with the featured local actor and a history professor on Thursday, March 14.

“Lincoln: The One-Man Show” will be shown at 6 p.m. in Preus-Brandt Forum. A discussion with Camarillo resident Gary Saderup, who portrays Lincoln, and David Nelson, an assistant professor of history at CLU, will follow.

Released on DVD in November, Saderup’s two-hour show encapsulates the 16th president’s life, from his folksy frontier humor to the eloquence of his presidential years. The film touches on how his views on politics, slavery and war formed and why he is the president revered most by a majority of Americans today. It features highlights like the Lincoln-Douglas debates, the Emancipation Proclamation and the Gettysburg Address as well as his early years as a prairie lawyer, his turbulent marriage to Mary Todd and his determination to preserve the Union.

Civil War era photos, music and graphics accompany Saderup’s portrayal of Lincoln. He also gives voice to other characters from the time, including Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and abolitionist Frederick Douglass.

“It is, in a word, awesome,” Los Angeles Time reviewer Tom Titus said.

Saderup read extensively about Lincoln, studied old dialect tapes, consulted costume experts and lost 28 pounds to play the part. Like the 2011 film of Saderup’s one-man show, “Douglas MacArthur: Return to Corregidor,” “Lincoln” was shot at Santa Paula High School.

The veteran stage actor has played other historical characters including John Barrymore and Charles Darwin. He has also appeared as Macbeth, Othello and Richard III. He has worked with author Ray Bradbury tocreate leading roles in two original plays.

Saderup studied illustration and film at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena and is a successful portraitist whose many charcoal drawings of famous people include one of Lincoln.

Preus-Brandt Forum is located south of Olsen Road between Mountclef Boulevard and Campus Drive on the Thousand Oaks campus.

The CLU History Club and University Relations Division are sponsoring the free event. For more information, contact Cindy Keitel at 805-493-3958 or ckeitel@callutheran.edu.

 

VENTURA, CA - Members of the Ventura community can listen to live music, learn more about the library’s programs and celebrate at E.P. Foster’s open house on Saturday, March 16.

The event will take place directly after the local parade from 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. in the E.P. Foster Library. This is an event for all ages and a chance for families and friends to learn more about everything the library can offer in the coming months.

There will be live music, food and much to learn during this community get-together. Stations will be set up throughout the library to inform attendees about upcoming programs, ranging from Children’s Summer Reading to Story Time to Open Mic Nights.

“This will be a great time for the community to learn about the exciting programs Foster is offering," said Sara Roberts, Senior City Librarian. “From poetry readings to eAudiobooks, we have a lot to show off.”

Attendees over the age of 18 will have the chance to win a Kindle through a raffle by visiting each station, sponsored by Friends of the Library.

For more information on E.P. Library visit www.vencolibrary.org/locations/epfoster or the Facebook page www.facebook.com/epfosterlibrary.

The mission of the Ventura County Library is to meet the general reading, life-long learning and informational needs of the people of Ventura County, with special focus on children, youth and families. E.P. Foster Library provides books, DVDs, music, programs and more to people of all ages. A free library card can be applied for and used at any Ventura County library location.

 
Original play explores the convergence of multiple generations, lives and pivotal moments

Camarillo, Calif., Feb. 21, 2013 – CSU Channel Islands (CI) invites the public to “Thresholds,” a world premiere original performance presented by the Performing Arts Program for its sixth annual spring production. The play explores the intersection of multiple generations and lives and the defining moments of change, or thresholds, that connect them.

Five performances will be held at Malibu Hall on the CI campus. Evening performances will be held at 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 7; Friday, March 8; Wednesday, March 13; and Thursday, March 14. One matinee performance will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 9.

Tickets are free for CI students, $5 for all other students, $10 for CI faculty and staff, and $15 for the public. To purchase tickets, call Brown Paper Tickets at 1-800-838-3006 or visit http://performingarts.csuci.edu/events.html. Tickets may also be purchased at the door with cash. Seating is limited, so advance purchase is recommended.

A fitting project for CI’s 10-year anniversary, “Thresholds” brings diverse parts of our community together to chronicle shared histories, celebrate common experiences, and discover new perspectives. “Thresholds” was developed by students from Performing Arts 391 Production, Art 499 Capstone, and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI), in collaboration with Project Lulu artists Lisa McKhann and Karen Keenan and acclaimed performance artist Tim Miller. The play is directed by Associate Professor of Performing Arts Catherine Scott Burriss and produced by Lecturer of Dance Heather Castillo, with musical direction by Lecturer of Music Craig Bickel.

“Thresholds” is made possible by funding from CI’s Instructionally Related Activities Fund, the Performing Arts Program, and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.

Limited complimentary parking is available on campus in designated spaces only. Upon arriving at the campus, please follow event parking signs. Free parking is available at the Camarillo Metrolink Station/Lewis Road parking lot in Camarillo with bus service to and from the campus. Riders should board the VISTA Bus to the campus; the fare is $1.25 each way. Buses arrive and depart from the Camarillo Metrolink Station every 30 minutes from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday and Saturday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For exact times, check the schedule at www.goventura.org.

Persons who, because of a special need or condition, would like to request an accommodation should contact Disability Resource Programs at 805-437-3331 or email accommodations@csuci.edu as soon as possible, but no later than 10 business days before the event, so that appropriate arrangements can be made.

For additional information, contact Dr. Catherine Scott Burriss, Associate Professor of Performing Arts, at 805-437-3126 or catherine.burriss@csuci.edu.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is celebrating 10 years of education, innovation, growth and community enrichment during the 2012/2013 academic year. We salute our faculty, staff, students, alumni, supporters, and partners who continue the CI mission of a student-centered education emphasizing international and multicultural perspectives with interdisciplinary and experiential service-oriented learning.

Together, we are solving the problems of today, preparing the leaders and innovators of tomorrow, and contributing to the vitality of higher education.

CSU Channel Islands – A Decade of Distinction