Starbucks was closed last on Thursday, December 31st, when a gas leak was discovered outside Little Caesar’s Pizza next door. It reopened the next day. Fillmore Starbucks had cut its hours recently, closing at 1PM, but returned to normal hours on January 6th.
Starbucks was closed last on Thursday, December 31st, when a gas leak was discovered outside Little Caesar’s Pizza next door. It reopened the next day. Fillmore Starbucks had cut its hours recently, closing at 1PM, but returned to normal hours on January 6th.
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On December 30th the California COVID Relief small business and non-profit grant program opened up to accept applications. Grants range from $5,000 to $25,000 and can be used to pay for an establishment’s rent, utilities, resources, employee expenses and other relevant costs. The deadline to apply for the first round is midnight on Friday, January 8, 2021. For additional information please visit https://careliefgrant.com. Courtesy City of Fillmore https://www.fillmore ca.com/Home/Components/News/News/3302/18 Post Date:12/30/2020.

 


 
The Sanitary Dairy taken in 1920, which was founded by Elvira and Clifford Hardison in 1916. The dairy is located on Old Telegraph Road in Fillmore and declared a County Landmark by the County Board of Supervisors in 1989. Photos courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum.
The Sanitary Dairy taken in 1920, which was founded by Elvira and Clifford Hardison in 1916. The dairy is located on Old Telegraph Road in Fillmore and declared a County Landmark by the County Board of Supervisors in 1989. Photos courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum.
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Sanitary Dairy truck in 1925, with Cliff, Dorothy, Russell and Evelyn Hardison sitting on the truck. Children would jump on and off the running boards to deliver milk.
Sanitary Dairy truck in 1925, with Cliff, Dorothy, Russell and Evelyn Hardison sitting on the truck. Children would jump on and off the running boards to deliver milk.
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Elvira Hardison at food stand, 1955.
Elvira Hardison at food stand, 1955.
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Courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum

The local dairy was founded in 1916 by Elvira and Clifford Hardison. Clifford Hardison was the resident manager on the Hardison Ranch Company’s La Campana property in Sespe when the young couple decided to start their own farm properties. When the nearby highway was realigned south from Muir, they then bought 10 acres on “Telegraph Road”. They bought cows (some from other local farmers) and started a herd of about 30. A modern milking barn and milk handling room were built to plans from the University of California. A prefabricated grain silo was purchased from Sears and set up on site. It was topped with an arrow and large wooden milk bottle and painted “SD”, signage that could be seen from the highway. A hay barn and corrals housed the cattle.

The name “Sanitary” meant the cows were certified as healthy and the raw milk handled according to all regulations. It was carefully chilled, put into glass bottles and promptly deliver by twice-daily routes throughout the area – as fresh as it could be!

Elvira Hardison opened a stand alongside the dairy and offered fresh-squeezed orange juice from their trees and dairy products from the cows that were milked where the public could watch. Homemade sandwiches and candies, sodas and other items were for sale. A small gas station, restrooms and shaded picnic area made the place a popular stop for locals and travelers approaching Fillmore.

The dairy prospered and expanded over the years. Their children all worked at dairy chores. Dorothy Hardison Nickerson recalled that she and her brother Russ ran to deliver bottles to doorsteps as Cliff or Elvira drove the delivery truck. Daughters Evelyn Hardison Richardson and Betty Jean Hardison Burritt helped to prepare food and staff the stand. Days were long and very busy. They recalled a record day during the depression when sales reached $100!

Russell Hardison got his college degree in Dairy Science from UC Davis. After his wartime service he returned and took of the retail part of the dairy in 1946 and eventually became owner of the whole business. The herd was expanded further to 60 cows and a new Creamery building went up in 1948 to accommodate equipment for pasteurization and more bottling capacity. Schools wanted pasteurized milk, and the baby-boomer generation filled the schools. Routes now went out to Piru and Santa Paula and beyond.

The highway was realigned again south in 1956, leaving now on “Old Telegraph Road.” Elvira saw that it was time to close the roadside stand after 40 years of good business.

Through the 50’s, 60’s, 70’s and beyond, owners Russell and Betty Hardison were active in the community – supporting local causes, entering floats in the annual Fillmore parade, and hosting many, many local school children on field trips to the dairy. Children could watch as the cows were milked, could pet baby calves, and drink some chocolate milk while wearing SD beanies!

Because of decreased demand for home delivery, routes were discontinued. Sales then concentrated on serving schools. The dairy cows left about that time, but the buildings remained.

Russ Hardison had milk bottled in up in his brands at other local dairies and actually owned school delivery routes until the early 1980’s. The Hardison home and the dairy buildings on Old Telegraph Road are now used for other purposes.

The Ventura County Board of Supervisors declared the Sanitary Dairy to be a County Landmark in 1989.

 


 
On December 21st a traffic collision was reported on Highway 126 near E Street in Fillmore. A white SUV veered off the road through some bushes, took out the Jim’s Fillmore Towing sign and struck a parked Nissan Sentra. Upon later investigation the driver was arrested for driving under the influence.
On December 21st a traffic collision was reported on Highway 126 near E Street in Fillmore. A white SUV veered off the road through some bushes, took out the Jim’s Fillmore Towing sign and struck a parked Nissan Sentra. Upon later investigation the driver was arrested for driving under the influence.
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Javier Almaraz, 49, Santa Paula.
Javier Almaraz, 49, Santa Paula.

On December 21, 2020, deputies assigned to the Fillmore Police Department responded to a traffic collision in the vicinity of Ventura and E Streets in Fillmore. Their investigation determined (S) Javier Almaraz had been driving while under the influence of alcohol and had collided with an Edison power pole; street, speed limit, and business signs; landscaping; a parked, unoccupied car; and a chain link fence. He was subsequently arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol.

Shortly before 9:00 PM Monday night, a witness called 9-1-1 to report a reckless driver on Highway 126. Before Fillmore deputies could find the vehicle, however, it was involved in a collision at Ventura and E Streets.

The investigation determined the driver, (S) Javier Almaraz, had originally been seen swerving in and out of his lane while westbound on Highway 126 from the Ventura/Los Angeles County line. Almaraz was reported to have driven on the wrong side of the four-lane highway and run a red light at B Street, as well.

Almaraz was found to have been driving with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of more than twice the legal limit of .08%. Almaraz, who was uninjured in the collision, was subsequently arrested for § 23152(a) and (b) of the California Vehicle Code, both misdemeanor DUI charges, and booked at the Pre-Trial Detention Facility with a bail of $5,000.

In an effort to prevent traffic collisions, the Fillmore Police Department recently received a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety and is utilizing these funds to actively seek and arrest motorists driving under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs.

It is extremely fortunate that this collision did not involve any other people, and no one was injured or killed as a result of Almaraz’ decision to drive while under the influence of alcohol. The members of the public who called to report his reckless driving and the collision are commended for their efforts, and the Fillmore Police Department encourages anyone witnessing unsafe driving to call 9-1-1 and help save lives.

Nature of Incident: Reckless driver call ends with non-injury traffic collision, DUI arrest
Report Number: 20-175566
Location: Ventura Street and E Street, Fillmore
Date & Time: 12-21-20 @ 9:03 PM
Unit(s) Responsible: Fillmore Patrol
(S)uspects, (V)ictims, (P)arty, (D)ecedent, City of Residence/Age
Javier Almaraz, Santa Paula, 49
Prepared by: Sergeant Kevin Vaden #2241
Approved by: Captain Garo Kuredjian

 


 
Early Monday, December 28th, the rain and winds came through town in full force. With heavy rain and winds on and off throughout the day Fillmore received .63 inches of rain. Above are the current rainfall totals for Fillmore and Piru from the Ventura County Public Works Agency Watershed Protection District Hydrology Section Season Rainfall Summary Report as of December 29th. See page 3 for more rain totals for Fillmore and Piru for monthly rainfall summary. For updates visit https://www.vcwatershed.net/fws/AutoMedia.htm.
Early Monday, December 28th, the rain and winds came through town in full force. With heavy rain and winds on and off throughout the day Fillmore received .63 inches of rain. Above are the current rainfall totals for Fillmore and Piru from the Ventura County Public Works Agency Watershed Protection District Hydrology Section Season Rainfall Summary Report as of December 29th. See page 3 for more rain totals for Fillmore and Piru for monthly rainfall summary. For updates visit https://www.vcwatershed.net/fws/AutoMedia.htm.
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Beginning early Monday morning into the evening a rainstorm blew through Ventura County bringing heavy rains and winds, but it left behind Christmas week snow on the Sespe Mountain Range.
Beginning early Monday morning into the evening a rainstorm blew through Ventura County bringing heavy rains and winds, but it left behind Christmas week snow on the Sespe Mountain Range.
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The impact of COVID-19 has created changes to shops in downtown Fillmore, such as posting multi-signs in windows and limiting the number of customers in-store at one time. For example, small stores like the Treasure Station have signs in their windows stating “Store Capacity 5 Customers at a Time, Masks Required” or “Please Wash Your Hands” that are now common to see as you walk down Central Avenue.
The impact of COVID-19 has created changes to shops in downtown Fillmore, such as posting multi-signs in windows and limiting the number of customers in-store at one time. For example, small stores like the Treasure Station have signs in their windows stating “Store Capacity 5 Customers at a Time, Masks Required” or “Please Wash Your Hands” that are now common to see as you walk down Central Avenue.
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Every year the Fillmore High School Alumni Scholarship Foundation gives thousands of dollars in scholarships to local Fillmore students. Pictured above are some of their past scholarship winners. Now the FHS Alumni Scholarship Foundation is asking the community to help with this coming year’s donations.
Every year the Fillmore High School Alumni Scholarship Foundation gives thousands of dollars in scholarships to local Fillmore students. Pictured above are some of their past scholarship winners. Now the FHS Alumni Scholarship Foundation is asking the community to help with this coming year’s donations.
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As a registered 501c3 organization, the Fillmore High Alumni Association welcomes all donations to their Scholarship Foundation. This year, we hope you consider a donation to their Scholarship program so that the Association can continue awarding Education Scholarships, and Continuing Education Grants to our Fillmore High Graduates. You can donate here, right now by clicking on this link, http://www.fillmorehighalumni.com/donate or if your in the Fillmore area, you can drop off a check through their mail slot on the front door of their office at 559 Sespe Ave. All donation amounts are welcomed. (Our Tax ID number will be provided) Thank you in advance for your continued support in helping us, help our Fillmore High Graduates!! Onward and Upwards!!

 
The Santa Clara River is flowing more than usual after Fillmore got a much need rain this past Monday, December 28th.
The Santa Clara River is flowing more than usual after Fillmore got a much need rain this past Monday, December 28th.
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The Fillmore Train Depot back in 1910 during its heyday. Photos courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum.
The Fillmore Train Depot back in 1910 during its heyday. Photos courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum.
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The Depot in 1943.
The Depot in 1943.
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The Depot in 1960.
The Depot in 1960.
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The Depot today.
The Depot today.
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Courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum

Seventy-five years ago, Fillmore and the rest of the world were just coming out of one of the worst series of events man had ever known – the Great Depression and World War II. Here is an excerpt from an article written in January, 1946, about our town by an unknown author.

“During the war everybody was expected to concentrate on winning for our side – and quite properly so.

But now that the war is over – theoretically at least – it would seem the part of wisdom to get busy, total up our prospects, and get going in high gear as soon as is humanly possible.

Suppose we start with buildings – both business and residential… There are some buildings that must be torn down to make way for progress… Why do we continue to tolerate the ancient edifice which is called by courtesy a railroad station? That rambling old wreck was built just after the Civil War, and is not getting any younger. When rain comes, the water naturally seeks the lowest level, which means that a good-sized pond is in evidence under the station floor for many days after each rain. The net result is rotting underpinning, so that when people walk into the depot they cannot be sure the floor will not give way and thus endanger life and limb.

From the amount of business, the (rail) road enjoys, it would seem at least that could be done would be a station which would be a credit to the railroad as well as the community. Looks like a very proper function for the Chamber of Commerce would be to storm the railroad offices and keep storming them until something is done about the deplorable condition.

Los Angeles has become so big that it is no place for people to live – so that many a business man has his business in Los Angeles, while his home is somewhere in the suburbs. Pretty soon many a Los Angeles business man will own a helicopter – and he will establish his home in Fillmore or some other suburban spot located in the fresh air zone. It will be a matter of ten or fifteen minutes to get home to Fillmore after closing hours…”

Well, not everything has come to pass quite as was predicted in 1946. The railroad didn’t improve the depot; instead it was closed and later sold to Edith Moore Jarrett for $1.05. It was moved and renovated to become the home of the Fillmore Historical Museum. In 1995 it was moved back near the tracks a little east of its original location. Even though the depot is not in the same location as it was in 1946, when it rains, water does accumulate beneath it – but now there is a very effective sump pump.

We do have helicopters flying over the town, but not for commuting business men. Not every businessman has his own helicopter, but with better roads and the move to telecommuting, Fillmore has become attractive to commuters, as can be seen with all the houses under construction. And the railroad has become a tourist attraction. We now enjoy the whistles and the sounds of the steam engine which reminds us of how it used to be all those years ago when the depot was the center of activity in town.