On Saturday, July 20th at 11a.m., at Fillmore City Hall, a plaque dedication ceremony was held by the Fillmore Police Brotherhood to honor those who served in the Fillmore Police Department from 1925 – 1987. Also recognized at the ceremony were the Ventura County Sheriff ’s Department and Santa Paula Police Department. The Master of Ceremonies was Captain Eric Tennessen VCSO/Chief of Police for Fillmore, the Fillmore Explores Club did the Presentation of Colors, Joe Ortiz band lead the National Anthem and Pledge of Allegiance, Invocation/Moment of Silence lead by Deacon Manuel Martinez honoring Art Munoz, Frank “Pancho” Gonzales, and Caril McLain. Guest Speakers were Fillmore Mayor Pro Tem Tim Holmgren, former Fillmore Police Chief Dick Diaz (pictured), VCSO Captain (retired) and former Santa Paula Chief of Police Walt Adair (retired), tribute to law enforcement by Elmo Sheeran honoring Hank Carrillo and Larry Carpenter.
On Saturday, July 20th at 11a.m., at Fillmore City Hall, a plaque dedication ceremony was held by the Fillmore Police Brotherhood to honor those who served in the Fillmore Police Department from 1925 – 1987. Also recognized at the ceremony were the Ventura County Sheriff ’s Department and Santa Paula Police Department. The Master of Ceremonies was Captain Eric Tennessen VCSO/Chief of Police for Fillmore, the Fillmore Explores Club did the Presentation of Colors, Joe Ortiz band lead the National Anthem and Pledge of Allegiance, Invocation/Moment of Silence lead by Deacon Manuel Martinez honoring Art Munoz, Frank “Pancho” Gonzales, and Caril McLain. Guest Speakers were Fillmore Mayor Pro Tem Tim Holmgren, former Fillmore Police Chief Dick Diaz (pictured), VCSO Captain (retired) and former Santa Paula Chief of Police Walt Adair (retired), tribute to law enforcement by Elmo Sheeran honoring Hank Carrillo and Larry Carpenter.
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COOLING CENTERS: Cooling Centers are available in Fillmore - Fillmore Active Adult Center, 533 Santa Clara Street, Fillmore (805) 524-3030, and Fillmore Library, 502 Second Street, Fillmore (805) 524-3355.

Heat kills by pushing the human body beyond its limits. In extreme heat and high humidity, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature.

Most heat disorders occur because the victim has been overexposed to heat or has over-exercised for his or her age and physical condition. Older adults, young children, and those who are sick or overweight are more likely to succumb to extreme heat.

WHAT TO DO BEFORE A HEAT EMERGENCY

To prepare for extreme heat, you should:
• Install window air conditioners snugly; insulate if necessary.
• Check air-conditioning ducts for proper insulation.
• Install temporary window reflectors (for use between windows and drapes), such as aluminum foil-covered cardboard, to reflect heat back outside.
• Weather-strip doors and sills to keep cool air in.
• Cover windows that receive morning or afternoon sun with drapes, shades, awnings, or louvers. (Outdoor awnings or louvers can reduce the heat that enters a home by up to 80 percent.)
• Keep storm windows up all year.
WHAT TO DO DURING A HEAT EMERGENCY
What you should do if the weather is extremely hot:
• Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun.
• Stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine if air conditioning is not available.
• Consider spending the warmest part of the day in public buildings such as libraries, schools, movie theaters, shopping malls, and other community facilities. Circulating air can cool the body by increasing the perspiration rate of evaporation.
• Eat well-balanced, light, and regular meals. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician.
• Drink plenty of water. Persons who have epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver disease; are on fluid-restricted diets; or have a problem with fluid retention should consult a doctor before increasing liquid intake.
• Limit intake of alcoholic beverages.
• Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, and light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible.
• Protect face and head by wearing a wide-brimmed hat.
• Check on family, friends, and neighbors who do not have air conditioning and who spend much of their time alone.
• Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles.
• Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day. Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat, and take frequent breaks.

 


 
The Fillmore Trout Hatchery has been closed to the public for maintenance and repairs since May 4, 2019. The facility is expected to reopen in September or October. All rainbow trout have been moved to Mojave River Hatchery in San Bernardino County to accommodate the necessary work. Once repairs to raceways, buildings and equipment are complete, the hatchery will begin to receive fish and will again be open to the public.
The Fillmore Trout Hatchery has been closed to the public for maintenance and repairs since May 4, 2019. The facility is expected to reopen in September or October. All rainbow trout have been moved to Mojave River Hatchery in San Bernardino County to accommodate the necessary work. Once repairs to raceways, buildings and equipment are complete, the hatchery will begin to receive fish and will again be open to the public.
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The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Fillmore Trout Hatchery in eastern Ventura County will be closed to the public approximately four months beginning May 4, while the facility undergoes maintenance and repairs. All of the rainbow trout normally raised at the Fillmore Trout Hatchery have been moved to the Mojave River Hatchery in San Bernardino County to accommodate the necessary work.

The Mojave River Hatchery underwent extensive maintenance and upgrades in 2017 and is now open to the public. The hatchery is again growing and stocking trout to approved waters in Southern California. With the Mojave River Hatchery back online, trout production and distribution is forecast to improve significantly for Southern California in 2018. It is now the Fillmore Trout Hatchery’s turn for facilities work and the Mojave River Hatchery has adequate room to raise fish for the Fillmore Trout Hatchery for the next few months.

As with the Mojave River Hatchery, the maintenance scheduled for the Fillmore Trout Hatchery will result in increased efficiencies and better trout production. The Fillmore Trout Hatchery has been in service to the public for 78 years. The maintenance and repairs scheduled include improving capability of the aeration tower, pressure washing and epoxy coating of the rearing ponds, plumbing upgrades, water and electrical use efficiencies, enhanced public outreach and educational materials for visitors and grounds work.

During the closure, Fillmore Trout Hatchery staff will perform maintenance and repairs to the raceways, buildings and equipment. Once the repair projects are complete, the hatchery will begin to receive fish and will again open to the public. CDFW estimates reopening in September or October.

For a list of fish plants, please see CDFW’s Fish Planting Schedule.

 


 
On Friday, July 12th, the Rotary Club of Fillmore participated in the Boys & Girls Club of Santa Clara Valley Kid’s Day by cooking hamburgers for 300+ kids, helping with the lunch line and handing out free books. The children are from local communities of Piru, Fillmore and Santa Paula. Thank you to Rotarian and CEO of BGC of SCV Jan Marholin! Not pictured, but in attendance, Rotarian and Fillmore Police Chief Eric Tennessen.Photos courtesy Rotary Club of Fillmore Facebook page.
On Friday, July 12th, the Rotary Club of Fillmore participated in the Boys & Girls Club of Santa Clara Valley Kid’s Day by cooking hamburgers for 300+ kids, helping with the lunch line and handing out free books. The children are from local communities of Piru, Fillmore and Santa Paula. Thank you to Rotarian and CEO of BGC of SCV Jan Marholin! Not pictured, but in attendance, Rotarian and Fillmore Police Chief Eric Tennessen.Photos courtesy Rotary Club of Fillmore Facebook page.
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Rotary Member Cindy Blatt and President Ari Larson smiling for a photo as they help hand food and books to the kids.
Rotary Member Cindy Blatt and President Ari Larson smiling for a photo as they help hand food and books to the kids.
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On Wednesday, July 17th at Fillmore City Hall, the Planning Commission held a public hearing in regards to the Fillmore Bible Church Central Avenue campus, and the Fillmore Christian Academy School site regarding plans to convert the property into 26 apartments and an artist studio while still maintaining existing structure. Also a portion of the school will be demolished and turned into a parking lot. Many gathered from the community to listen as well as voice their concerns to the Board.
On Wednesday, July 17th at Fillmore City Hall, the Planning Commission held a public hearing in regards to the Fillmore Bible Church Central Avenue campus, and the Fillmore Christian Academy School site regarding plans to convert the property into 26 apartments and an artist studio while still maintaining existing structure. Also a portion of the school will be demolished and turned into a parking lot. Many gathered from the community to listen as well as voice their concerns to the Board.
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District Attorney Gregory D. Totten announced today that Jaime Serna (DOB 1/29/1972), formerly of Fillmore, was placed on formal probation for a period of 36 months after pleading guilty to a felony violation of Insurance Code section 1871.4(a), making a fraudulent statement of a material fact for the purpose of obtaining workers’ compensation benefits. Serna must make restitution to the victim, American Claims Management, in the amount of $27,955 and serve 180 days in the Ventura County jail as a condition of his probation.

Serna was employed by Agromin in Santa Paula as a truck driver and injured his right shoulder on May 12, 2010. He was placed off work on temporary total disability and had shoulder surgery on September 10, 2010. He remained off work and continued to collect temporary total disability benefits of two-thirds of his salary, tax free. On February 12, 2012, Agromin received a tip that Serna was working on cars and engaging in physical activities that contradicted his claimed physical limitations. Agromin notified its workers’ compensation insurance administrator, who retained private investigators to conduct surveillance of Serna.

Investigators obtained seven and a half hours of surveillance video of Serna working on cars at his residence. He was seen removing a radiator from the engine compartment, and removing and replacing batteries and the wheels and tires off the vehicle. He was also observed picking up a 36-lb. floor jack and carrying it into his garage. In July 2012, Serna gave a deposition and lied under oath about his injuries.

Workers’ compensation insurance fraud is not a victimless crime. It impacts honest business owners who provide insurance coverage to their employees. In the United States, fraudulent claims cost insured employers $2 billion annually, with much of these costs passed onto the public. Our office will vigorously prosecute unscrupulous employees who attempt to victimize employers.

The Ventura County District Attorney’s Office is the public prosecutor for the county’s 850,000 residents. The office employs approximately 280 employees including attorneys, investigators, victim advocates, and other professional support staff who strive to seek justice, ensure public safety, and protect the rights of crime victims.

 

A donation to the Heilman “F” fund helps keep our beloved chalked “F” on the hill above Fillmore lit-up at night. The Fillmore High Alumni Association is proud keep this fund to provide ongoing financial support for buying new lights, replacing batteries, parts, etc., as needed. Frank Poncho Morales and friends carved the “F” out on the hill in the 1930’s, and John Heilman, Fillmore High graduate Class of 1953, and friends, illuminated it with solar lights in 2018. Thank you Frank, John, and friends! You can make a donation at http://www.fillmorehighalumni.com/donate/ Let’s keep the “F” glowing!!

 

Flick & Float is coming on Friday, July 26th at 9 p.m. at the Fillmore Aquatic Center; they will be showing “Moana”, $3 for everyone 3 years+. Bring your own floatie, blankets, or lawn chairs (limited bleacher seating available). Remember there is no swimming while the movie is playing, you may only be in the pool on your floatie. Food/Treat trucks will be present!!! Come join us for a movie night in Fillmore! Courtesy City of Fillmore Instagram page.

 
Photo of the Week "At midnight, workers preparing high-voltage wires for pole replacement" by Bob Crum. Photo data: Canon 7D MKII camera in manual mode, Tamron 1.4 teleconverter & 16-300mm lens @340mm. Exposure; ISO 3200, aperture f/8.0, 1/50 second shutter speed.
Photo of the Week "At midnight, workers preparing high-voltage wires for pole replacement" by Bob Crum. Photo data: Canon 7D MKII camera in manual mode, Tamron 1.4 teleconverter & 16-300mm lens @340mm. Exposure; ISO 3200, aperture f/8.0, 1/50 second shutter speed.
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It's all about timing
Bob Crum
Bob Crum

Last week's car show photos roused the readership in a big way: 37 emails! Most were technical, specifically about the star-shaped sunbursts, like starbursts.

Alec R. asked: "How do I get that effect with my iPhone?" Alec, ALEC! You are such an incorrigible phonetographer. To capture the star-shaped sunbursts, you have to close down the iPhone camera's aperture to f/22 or smaller. Oh, wait, you can't do that on your iPhone. So sorry! Well, guess you'll just have to buy a real camera!

Tom B. wrote to say: "Many of the car show photos show people. I just want to see photos of the cars." Tom, I understand. The event was so well attended I felt like I had to climb over a herd of octopuses having a committee meeting on Central Ave to get a car photo. See you there next year?

The sunstars on the black Chevy photo of the week prompted Alice M. to ask: "Did you add them in Photoshop?" Alice, how could you? No, not added in PS! They were all captured in the camera. It was possible because 1, plentiful chrome on the grille, 2, the position of the car relative to the sun (car parked facing west) and the sun's position in the sky making the reflective light possible. Those elements combined resulted in a bonanza of sunstars.

Since most of the questions are about the sunstars, let's again review the process. Please note, the technique is done with a camera, hardly ever possible with a cell phone. If all you have is a cellphone, see my suggestion for Alec above.

Sunstars can occur while aiming the camera at the sun or from a reflected surface. If it's the sun directly, it has to be a time of day when the sun is beginning to get lower in the sky because the effect occurs when it meets a physical object. As the sun gets lower in the sky, line up an object with the sun in your camera's viewfinder. It can be a tree limb, building roof corner or a carnival ride. Stop down your camera's lens aperture to f/22 or smaller. Adjust ISO and shutter speed to maintain correct exposure. Remain mobile, i.e., constantly move back and forth until the sun barely touches the object it's next to. You'll see the sunburst rays change as you move to and fro. Make the photo at exactly the right instant. Don't stop with one photo. Shoot several as you move about changing the effect of the rays where the sun meets the object. In post-processing, you'll see that one that you made will be the best. Celebrate your achievement with your favorite beverage.

Regarding reflective sunburst rays, like on the black Chevrolet's chrome, remember the two important elements: Time of day and camera position relative to the car. I needed to wait for the overcast to clear. No sunlight, no sunbursts! It's all about timing and the sun.

It's great to find lost stuff. At the last place I looked, I found my long ago lost Tamron 1.4 teleconverter. A teleconverter (TC) is like a lens magnifying glass. Mounting my Tamron 16-300mm lens on the TC increases the reach to 420mm. Sweet! To test the combo, I went outside where in the dark of night, I shot two workers on cherry pickers preparing to move high-voltage wires to a new pole. But why that photo for the photo of the week? Ulterior motive? Of course! Who believes that a cell phone could have made that photo? Anyone? Point made? Happy photoing. See the car show slideshow video here: https://youtu.be/W9l2o-36j1I

Send comments, suggestions or questions to: focusonphotography@earthlink.net

 

Target practice on private property has been determined to be the cause of a 131-acre fire on Sunday, July 14th, between Fillmore and Santa Paula. The fire was reported at 11:40 p.m. in the 21600 block of South Mountain Road, spreading to light to medium brush. It was contained south of South Mountain Road, east of Balcom Canyon, north of the ridge line and west of Bardsdale Cemetery. Three firefighters were sent to the hospital; one with an ankle injury, and two due to dehydration. More than 300 personnel and equipment were assigned to the fire. Tankers 76 and 78 were called in from Porterville and Air Attack 07 from Santa Maria. LA County Copter 16 also responded. At least a dozen dozers were called to the scene. Handcrews and type-3 engines designed to work on narrow dirt roads and rugged terrain were called in. At approximately 2:50 p.m. a drone was spotted over the fire; law enforcement was requested. Per the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, 43 CFR 9212.1(f), it is illegal to resist or interfere with the efforts of firefighters to extinguish a fire. Doing so can result in a significant fine and/or a mandatory court appearance. Even a small drone can cause a serious or fatal accident if it collides with firefighting aircraft. In most situations, if drones are spotted near a wildfire, firefighting aircraft must land due to safety concerns. This prolongs firefighting operations; in many cases, wildfires become larger when aircraft are not able to drop fire retardant, water, monitor wildfires from above, or provide tactical information to firefighters. Homes and other values at risk could burn needlessly, firefighters or others could be injured, or worst of all, a fatal accident could occur. No evacuations and no structures were involved. No information released if the shooter will be held financially liable for the fire. Photos courtesy Ventura County Fire Department.