Photo of the Week: "Scarlet, Potbelly pig, Queen of Faria Beach" by Bob Crum. Photo data: Canon 7D MKII camera, Tamron 16-300mm lens @26mm. Exposure; ISO 400, aperture f/11, shutter speed 1/320 second.
Photo of the Week: "Scarlet, Potbelly pig, Queen of Faria Beach" by Bob Crum. Photo data: Canon 7D MKII camera, Tamron 16-300mm lens @26mm. Exposure; ISO 400, aperture f/11, shutter speed 1/320 second.
Enlarge Photo
Touché!
Bob Crum
Bob Crum

Understandably, I received many emails asking: Why did you become ill? I don't know why, but I know how because I witnessed it in a dream. It began with the arrival of the Quadpulse Interplanetary SUV from the planet Hephaestus in the 5th galaxy of the constellation Triangulum Australe. Reverse thrusters roaring, the ship stopped abruptly and hovered over my bedroom. The metallic-looking Kenzyke wearing green-tinted diaphanous attire suddenly appeared at my bedside. With the precision of a Kia car-factory robot, it promptly injected a pathogen (pneumonia) into my arm and vanished. A small welt remains, umm, wait, it's a pimple. (Excerpts from the science-fiction book I'm writing: Kenzyke Irruption, Dreams Manifested.)

Print value redux. Recall that I recently exalted photographic prints citing digital-photography-school.com's blog. Paraphrasing, there is joy in taking photos and viewing them digitally. However, a photo that isn’t printed is like a script that is never performed or a musical composition that is never played. There's value in the digital photo, just as there is value in a script or musical composition but the real value is the print itself.

Paraphrasing photographer Huntington Witherill: “The electronic image could no more replace a fine photographic print than a synthesizer could replace a violin!”

Popular photography concludes: "A good, framed photo hanging on your wall is worth 50,000 shots sitting in the cloud doing nothing. They can remind you of your friends and family members, great times, and who you used to be in the good ol’ days, while digital photos just bit-rot away on a hard drive." That's very potent!

Paraphrasing photographer Christopher Burkett: “The fine print is much more than a mere reproduction of an image. It is the culmination of the inspiration and vision of the photographer. In its highest form, the fine print can be a transparent vehicle, boldly communicating with whispers and suggestions of worlds previously unseen and unknown. No other form of the image can convey as powerfully the subtleties, the presence and the luminosity which exists in the fine print.”

Not everyone agrees. I received emails from several phonetographers who insist that in this digital age making prints is a waste of money. Good point! I wouldn't waste money printing anything like a lot of the shoot-to-delete crap-shots I see on social media. When you make a print, you are making an art object. Has anyone tried hanging a jpeg digital file on their living room wall? Touché!

Last Sunday, friends camping at Faria Beach County Park invited me over for BBQ. The Fillmore sky looked promising for a glorious sunset, so of course I took my camera and Daryl Benson reverse graduated filters.

The reverse grads are darkest in the center, clear on the bottom and transition from dark to light above the horizon, ideal for sunsets and sunrises. Typically, these scenes feature a bright horizon, dark foreground and medium-bright sky above the horizon. Placing the darkest density on the horizon line will reduce the sun's brightness, lighten the foreground through the clear portion of the filter and add a subtle gradation of brightness to the sky — all in a single exposure.

With two 0.6 reverse ND grad filters in the Lee filter holder mounted on the lens, I was ready. However, with a two-thousand-foot thick cloud bank sitting on the horizon, the prospect of a spectacular sunset doomed. (sigh) However, spirits buoyed with the delightful sandpipers appearing as did Scarlet, a portly potbellied pig, the Queen of Faria Beach. Happy photoing!

Send comments, questions or suggestions to: focusonphotography@earthlink.net

 


 
 


 
Public Health Urges Preparedness for Social Distancing

In the face of a significant increase in the numbers of confirmed cases of novel coronavirus
(COVID-19) in mainland China and other Countries, many Ventura County residents are understandably worried and fearful. The Ventura County Department of Public Health (Public Health), out of an abundance of caution, is seeking to solidify the County's readiness should the COVID-19 virus be found here or in a nearby county.

Public Health is urging agencies, businesses, school districts, organizations and health care providers throughout the County to develop and/or update a plan for social distancing. “These groups are being asked to accomplish this within 24 to 48 hours,” said Dr. Robert Levin, Health Officer. “The discovery of community transmission elsewhere in the State makes me feel that COVIO-19 could arrive in our County at any time and we want to be prepared.” Community transmission means person-to-person spread. “Our first level of Protection comes from the quarantine and isolation of certain individuals,” said Dr. Levin. Levin stressed that these plans will not be put into effect immediately. “Once cases of COVID-19 are found in the community, it’s time to implement social distancing plans.” Social distancing means lessening contact between individuals throughout the County. Businesses, for instance, would review their staffing and identify workers who could work from home. This results in fewer people and less contact between people at the workplace as well. Members of the public should speak with their employer about whether they can still fulfill responsibilities of their jobs while working from home.

A population that is at particular risk from the COVID-19 is the elderly. Extended Care Facilities are being asked to write or update their plans for protecting their residents from interaction with those from outside their place of residence.

While children seem to be faring better than other groups with COVID-19, schools have made significant advances in their planning for possible temporary closure. Some schools were closed for weeks during the HAN1 pandemic ten years ago. It is important that schools and childcare facilities have a plan in place and are communicating with parents.

Primary care medical sites are being asked to implement plans to communicate with patients via Skype, FaceTime and over the phone. Many patient visits can be dealt with distantly thus avoiding crowding of clinics and the resulting increased risk of close contact which might further spread COVID-19.

There is little evidence that pregnant women are at particularly increased risk from this virus, but special care should still be taken to decrease their social contacts.

Gatherings such as regular religious services might consider live streaming their service so that congregants can view the service from home, or they may consider modifying their service so that there can be at least two spaces between each congregant.

“The cancelation of large, non-essential gatherings is a possibility down the line,” said Dr. Levin, “implementation of social distancing plans should be handled with creativity, flexibility and sensitivity.”

Above all, people who are starting to feel ill or who are ill, should stay away from others and not go into crowded settings.

People should continue to practice the same habits they perform to prevent themselves from getting the flu.
They should wash their hands frequently, elbow or fist bump one another instead of shaking hands or hugging, sneeze or cough into the crook of their elbow and maintain a six foot or greater distance between themselves and anyone who looks ill, Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. Get a flu immunization to prevent influenza if you have not done so this season. The only two needs for face masks are the wearing of a surgical mask if you are ill and going out in public, such as going to the doctor's office or if you are a health care worker, wearing an N9S mask when you ae interacting with patients.

Preparedness information and up to date information about the situation in the County of ventura can be found at www.vcemergency.com. Updates will also continue to be provided on County of Ventura social media Facebook: @countyofventura, Twitter: @CountyVentura Nextdoor @County of Ventura Instagram: @Venutra_County_news

For the most up to date information regarding the 2019 novel coronavirus on the national level, please visit the Centers for Disease Control and PreventiWQon at https://www.cdc gov/corenavirus/2019-ncov/index html.

 


 
 


 
 


 
Ari Larson, 2019 Citizen of the Year.
Ari Larson, 2019 Citizen of the Year.

The Fillmore Community Awards Committee is proud to announce Ari Larson as the 2019 Citizen of the Year!

“Ari’s passion to serve in whatever capacity for the benefit of our community and Ventura County is nothing short of breathtaking” exclaimed former Fillmore Mayor Ernie Villegas. She sees the community as a whole and tries to help different organizations including those that help children, senior citizens, and those who face serious health issues. She is also involved with youth organizations, business advocacy, veterans, and our agricultural community.

Ari belongs to many local and county-wide organizations and serves in a leadership position including chair, and the executive board. Currently she is President of Fillmore Rotary, Region District Director for the Soroptimist International Camino Real Division, Board Member and Past President of the Boys & Girl’s Club of the Santa Clara Valley. She also sits on the boards of the Fillmore Association of Businesses, Heritage Valley Tourism Bureau, Santa Clara Valley Hospice (Vice President), is the City’s Representative on the Ventura County Area Agency on Aging. Ms. Larson also volunteers her time on various committees including the Fillmore Veteran’s Parade, Relay for Life, St. Francis Dam 90th Commemorative Committee, and the California Women for Agriculture Ventura County Chapter just to name a few.

Ari is currently working in Public Relations for Diamond Realty and is a consultant to some local small businesses. She is married to Peter Larson and they have two Chihuahua dogs named Penelope and Cleo. In her spare time, she sleeps.

The Community Awards will take place on Saturday, April 11, 6:00pm – 8:00pm at the Fillmore-Piru Memorial Building. More information to follow.

 

Fillmore High School is proud to announce that senior student Isabella Palazuelos has been recognized as a National Merit Scholar.

The National Merit Scholar Program annually recognizes 16,000 students out of 1.6 million eligible students nationwide as semifinalists based on student performance for the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude exam. Of those 16,000 students, only 15,000 are selected to receive a Certificate of Merit as a finalist. Finally, only 7,500 students out of the 15,000 finalists are granted scholarships that may include full college tuition. Miss Palazuelos was presented a Certificate of Merit from her high school principal on February 5, 2020 at Fillmore High School. Fillmore High School has not had a National Merit Scholar in recent memory.

Miss Palazuelos has applied to several prestigious universities, both in and out of California, and is expecting to receive notification of acceptance this spring. Isabella Palazuelos is a well-rounded student as she participates in several activities at Fillmore High School, which include: the Advanced Placement program; a medalist as part of the award winning 2020 Fillmore High School Academic Decathlon team; a three sport athlete (volleyball, water polo and swimming); the leader of the Fillmore High School Mock Trial team; Band and Jazz Ensemble; the Interact Club; MEChA; the Chess Club; and the Mentor Program.

Isabella is the daughter of Adrian and Julie Palazuelos and has three siblings in the Fillmore Unified School District: Olivia, grade 11; Nadia, grade 7; and Adrian Junior, Transitional Kindergarten.

Our sincere congratulations go out to Isabella Palazuelos!

 
Fillmore Unified School District
Fillmore Unified School District

Public Hearing and Receipt of Initial Proposal
Public hearing and receipt of initial proposal of the Fillmore Unified Teachers Association (FUTA) to the Fillmore
Unified School District (FUSD) for reopener negotiations for the contract commencing on July 1, 2020 (Materials).

Network Infrastructure Update
The Governing Board received an update on the Fillmore USD network infrastructure.

Approval of the Second Interim Report through January 31, 2020, Including Amendments to the 2019-2020 Budget
The Governing Board approved the Second Interim Report.

Approval of Resolution No. 19-20-14 for Relief from Penalties for Piru Preschool Program Closure Due to Wear Main Repairs
The Governing Board approved Resolution 19-20-14.

Personnel Recommendations
The Board approved all personnel recommendations including new hires, promotions, resignations, and leaves.

 
Friday, February 28th at 10am city officials, county administrators, firefighters and others gathered in front of County Fire Station 27 for the Blue Ribbon cutting ceremony. The Fillmore station has been operating since November 24th, 2019 and was originally expected to open in December 2017; however construction took longer than planned. According to the department the project cost totaled $11.5 million which included construction, environmental reports, architecture, and other work. The station takes up 1500 sq ft on 2.7 acres and sits at 133 C Street. Attending were County Superintendent Kelly Long, Fillmore City Manager Dave Rowlands, Fillmore Mayor Tim Holmgren, Fillmore Police Chief Garo Kuredjian, Fillmore Councilmen Manuel Minjares and Mark Austin, and Fillmore Fire Chief Keith Gurrola, plus several other community members.
Friday, February 28th at 10am city officials, county administrators, firefighters and others gathered in front of County Fire Station 27 for the Blue Ribbon cutting ceremony. The Fillmore station has been operating since November 24th, 2019 and was originally expected to open in December 2017; however construction took longer than planned. According to the department the project cost totaled $11.5 million which included construction, environmental reports, architecture, and other work. The station takes up 1500 sq ft on 2.7 acres and sits at 133 C Street. Attending were County Superintendent Kelly Long, Fillmore City Manager Dave Rowlands, Fillmore Mayor Tim Holmgren, Fillmore Police Chief Garo Kuredjian, Fillmore Councilmen Manuel Minjares and Mark Austin, and Fillmore Fire Chief Keith Gurrola, plus several other community members.
Enlarge Photo
 
Saturday, February 29th at 7:24pm an accident took place at Highway 126 east of Cavin Road. When crews arrived they found a single vehicle roll over accident on the eastbound side of Highway 126 with one person trapped inside the vehicle. By 7:40pm firefighters were able to extract the driver with a door-pop maneuver, meaning they did not have to cut through the vehicle. Cause of the crash is still under investigation.
Saturday, February 29th at 7:24pm an accident took place at Highway 126 east of Cavin Road. When crews arrived they found a single vehicle roll over accident on the eastbound side of Highway 126 with one person trapped inside the vehicle. By 7:40pm firefighters were able to extract the driver with a door-pop maneuver, meaning they did not have to cut through the vehicle. Cause of the crash is still under investigation.
Enlarge Photo