Back in November of this year construction began on 77 affordable workforce housing units at the corner of Mountain View and Highway 126. Above is an architect’s rendering of the units.
Back in November of this year construction began on 77 affordable workforce housing units at the corner of Mountain View and Highway 126. Above is an architect’s rendering of the units.
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This housing project is a joint venture with the Area Housing Authority of the County of Ventura. Funding sources for this project come from Ventura County Housing Trust Fund Acquisition Loan, County of Ventura CDBG Funds, State Funds, Area Housing Authority of the County of Ventura Permanent, Loan and Project Based Vouchers, Conventional Permanent Loan, and 4% Tax Credits + Tax Exempt Bond.

The Community Amenities available will be Manager/Services Offices, Community Room, On-Site Library Services In, Partnership With The Ventura County Library System, Two Playgrounds, Outdoor Activity Center, On-Site Laundry, Community Gardens, Picnic/BBQ, Garage Parking and Guest Parking.

For more information visit https://www.manymansions.org/properties-in-development/mountain-view-fil...

 


 
Fillmore’s Nova Storage has completed their Sespe label mural which Fillmore artist Gabriel Cardenas began back in November of this year. They plan to begin a third mural in January 2021.
Fillmore’s Nova Storage has completed their Sespe label mural which Fillmore artist Gabriel Cardenas began back in November of this year. They plan to begin a third mural in January 2021.
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Saturday, November 14th Fillmore artist, musician, and “artivist” Gabriel Cardenas began a new mural project for Nova Storage here in Fillmore at 455 A Street. Nova Storage reached out to the community by conducting an online poll where people voted on their favorite historic fruit label design. The community’s response was greater than expected and the winner was the SESPE label. Above is the is the second of three murals planned for the building. The first mural was completed back in April of this year. Nova Storage plans on beginning working on the third mural in January 2021.

Nova Storage continues to be active in their local communities, with nine branches providing superior customer service and offering clean, safe and secure facilities at a great rate. Stop by one of their locations, like them on Facebook, follow on Instagram, and visit their website at www.Nova Storage.com.

 


 

SoCalGas announces additional donation to the Gas Assistance Fund to help customers in need. There is still time for income qualified individuals and families to apply for up to $200 to help pay their gas bills. To learn more, go to https://sempra.mediaroom.com/index.php?s=19080&item=137863. Courtesy City of Fillmore.

 


 
James F. Mclntyre in the 1900’s smoking his bee hives. Photos courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum.
James F. Mclntyre in the 1900’s smoking his bee hives. Photos courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum.
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Young family bees on Oak Flat in 1916.
Young family bees on Oak Flat in 1916.
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Beehives in Bardsdale.
Beehives in Bardsdale.
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Courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum

Honey bees were introduced into North America in 1622 in Jamestown and from there slowly spread across the continent. By 1850, bee colonies were appearing in the San Jose area and soon came south.

By 1876, Robert Wilkin moved his apiary from Ohio to Sespe. Even without the orchards that would soon come to the area, the abundant native vegetation, especially sage, wild alfalfa and buckwheat, provided for the bees. This particular apiary was taken over by Mr. Wilkin’s son-in-law, James F. McIntyreshown here in 1900, smoking a hive to sedate the bees so the frames of honey comb could be safely removed.

The process at the McIntyre apiary was explained in the October 10, 1891 issue of Pacific Rural Press (San Francisco).

“The land slopes about ten feet from the back of the apiary to the honey house, which makes it easy to wheel the honey into the house. Two carts… are used to wheel in the honey. Each cart carries four "supers” full, or about 200 pounds at a load. When extracting, one man fills one cart with honey in the apiary, while the other extracts the other cart-load in the honey house. It takes from 20 to 30 minutes to fill a cart, and the man in the honey house can easily extract one in the same time. A three-inch pipe runs from a reservoir down through the apiary and connects with a Pelton water motor in the honey house, which furnishes sufficient power to run a small circular saw or the honey extractor. The honey runs from the extractor into iron tank, shown below the honey house, which hold 8000 pounds each, where It is allowed to stand for one or two weeks, and is then drawn off through a molasses gate into 60-pound cans for the market.”

The entire McIntyre family was committed to beekeeping. They had 4 daughters and one son. The son was named Robert, the girls were all named after plants – Myrtle, Flora, Lily and Pansy. According to the San Francisco Call, October 31, 1906, Flora was paying her way through UC Berkeley by raising and selling queen bees at $1 each. “Her skill in handling the insects is such as to qualify her for rank with the entomologists of the university.”

The McIntyres in Sespe were not the only apiarists in the area. Tommy Arundell became well known with his hives in Pole Creek. In 1893, he delivered a paper to the California Beekeepers Association on “Economy in Bee Keeping”. Nate and Al Stone, who are remembered as some of the hunters who supplied Fillmore with fresh meat, also conducted a thriving honey business in the 1910s and 20s. The Haase family had extensive honey operations at Oak Flat as did the Young family. Piru Canyon is still a major honey producing area.

By 1910, Ventura County had over 11,000 hives of bees and produced over 400,000 pounds of honey, the majority of which was produced in the Fillmore area.

 


 
On Sunday, December 6th from 4:30 PM to 7 PM at the Veterans Memorial building, Fillmore Fire Foundation hosted their Annual Toy Drive & Chicken Dinner. This year’s dinner was drive-thru style because of the COVID-19 pandemic. People were able to drive by and drop off an unwrapped toy and get a chicken dinner. The fundraiser is to help collect toys and funds for the Annual Community Holiday Giveaway to be held Sunday, December 12th. Photos Courtesy City of Fillmore Facebook page.
On Sunday, December 6th from 4:30 PM to 7 PM at the Veterans Memorial building, Fillmore Fire Foundation hosted their Annual Toy Drive & Chicken Dinner. This year’s dinner was drive-thru style because of the COVID-19 pandemic. People were able to drive by and drop off an unwrapped toy and get a chicken dinner. The fundraiser is to help collect toys and funds for the Annual Community Holiday Giveaway to be held Sunday, December 12th. Photos Courtesy City of Fillmore Facebook page.
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On Monday, December 7th at 11:44 AM a fire broke out in the Santa Clara riverbed south of Santa Paula, causing closures for both east and west bound lanes of Highway 126 at Briggs exit. The blaze is said to have been caused by a large tree falling onto power lines. With 35-plus mph Santa Ana winds it structures as well as agricultural operations. Evacuations were assessed
but did not take place. By 3 PM the fire grew to 174 acres, and between 4 PM and 5 PM the freeway closure was put into place. Tow-hundred fire fighters were sent out to battle the blaze; no damages were reported.

 
On Monday, December 7th gusty 35-plus mph Santa Ana winds blew through Fillmore leaving some destruction behind. In the 700 block of 3rd Street a tree was knocked down nearly missing a house.
On Monday, December 7th gusty 35-plus mph Santa Ana winds blew through Fillmore leaving some destruction behind. In the 700 block of 3rd Street a tree was knocked down nearly missing a house.
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On Friday, December 4th at 3:46 PM a fire was reported north of Fillmore in the Sespe Wilderness near Four Fork Creek Road and Hopper Mountain. A helicopter was dispatched to Quarter Acre Brush Fire North of Fillmore the scene for water drops due to the remote location of the blaze, as well as fire engines on the ground. By 5:30 PM ground crews made a line surrounding the fire allowing them to cease water drops and contain the fire reported at a quarter acre. No damages or injuries were reported at the time of the incent; cause is still under investigation.

 
The Fillmore Condors Youth Cross Country Team which competed at the AAU Youth Cross Country Nationals in Florida on Saturday, December 5th. Top row, left to right: Leah Barragan, Yarely Herrera, Coach Felix Zuniga, Noah Flores, Diego Felix, Diego Rodriguez, Coach Phil Ramirez, Lindsey Ramirez, Yarably Herrera. Middle row, left to right: Lucy Zuniga, Natalia Retana, Santiago Felix, Abel Arana, Itzel Arana. Bottom row, left to Right: Coaches Andrea Mendez and Gerardo Flores. Photos courtesy Fillmore Condors XC President Erika Arana.
The Fillmore Condors Youth Cross Country Team which competed at the AAU Youth Cross Country Nationals in Florida on Saturday, December 5th. Top row, left to right: Leah Barragan, Yarely Herrera, Coach Felix Zuniga, Noah Flores, Diego Felix, Diego Rodriguez, Coach Phil Ramirez, Lindsey Ramirez, Yarably Herrera. Middle row, left to right: Lucy Zuniga, Natalia Retana, Santiago Felix, Abel Arana, Itzel Arana. Bottom row, left to Right: Coaches Andrea Mendez and Gerardo Flores. Photos courtesy Fillmore Condors XC President Erika Arana.
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Some of the Fillmore Condors XC Team in Florida.
Some of the Fillmore Condors XC Team in Florida.
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Courtesy Fillmore Condors Cross Country President Erika Arana

The Fillmore Condors Cross Country team concluded their 2020 season by participating in the AAU Youth Cross Country Nationals on Saturday, December 5th, 2020. Although there wasn’t the usual number of runners, over 2,000 athletes still made the trip to Tallahassee, Florida to compete at the 100+ acres, known as the premiere cross-country facility at Apalachee Regional Park. This multi-use park includes one of the nation’s few sites designed specifically for cross country running. The pristine trail features numerous course/distance options through the rolling hills, lowlands and pine forests. The trail was designed to give runners the opportunity to run on several types of surfaces. For a few of our athletes, this was their second time racing at this very same course, back in 2017. Weather conditions were a lot better for our athletes, this time around. The Florida rain drenched the course the night before, forcing our athletes to run on some muddy trails. Overall, it felt like the California weather they were used to.

This year, by far was the most challenging, due to Covid restrictions. Most of our season racing, were held as “Inter-Team Time Trials”. This is how national teams were determined at the end. Our fourteen local Condors joined other area runners to form Valley United Striders. Condor representatives were Abel Arana, Itzel Arana, Leah Barragan, Diego Felix, Santiago Felix, Destina Guzman, Yaraby Herrera, Lindsey Ramirez, Natalia Retana, Diego Rodriguez, Lucy Zuniga and sisters - Kaylie, Kirsten, and Kristen Theobald.

With high school sports on hold, we welcomed three Condor Alumni’s to join our National team. The third race of the day was the girls 13 and 14-year-old, with 214 runners. Lindsey Ramirez 98th overall and 57th, individually for the 14-year-olds; Lindsey had over a 2-minute PR of 15:38.15. Her alumni teammate, Yaraby Herrera had been battling a hamstring injury 2 weeks prior and still managed to fight her way through it during her race. Yaraby placed 187th overall and 94th individually, for the 14-year-old girls; 18:29.26. The boys 13 & 14-year-old division had a stacked field of 245 runners. Alumni, Diego Rodriquez finished strong, placing 91st overall and 62nd individually, for the 14-year-olds; PR 13:37.66. Diego Felix crossed the finish line in a PR 15:02.03, placing 186th overall and 79th individually, for the 13-year-olds. Due to an injury, Condor Noah Flores had to withdraw his National team spot. These youth four, ran a 3,000-meter (2.48 mile) race.

Following was the girls 11 and 12-year-old division, that consisted of 240 runners. Leah Barragan placed 160th overall and 96th individually, for the 12-year-olds; 13:08.41. Santiago Felix ran the boys 11 and 12-year-old division race, that saw 212 runners that morning. He finished strong with a time 12:27.39, placing 164th overall and 71st in the 11-year-olds, individually. Both Leah and Santiago ran a 3,000-meter (1.86 mile) race.

142 runners toed the starting line in the girls 9 and 10-year-old race, with four of the Striders being Condors. They pack ran the entire way to a 3rd team podium appearance. Theobald sisters, Kristen ran 12:28.55, 42nd overall and 11th individually, for the 9-year-olds; Her sister Kirsten behind with a 12:32.25, 49th overall and 13th individually, for the 9-year-olds. Lucy Zuniga, a second behind her teammate, crossed with a time of 12:33.14 for a 50th overall finish and 14th individually, for the 9-year-olds. Destina Guzman tried hard to hold on to her teammates to finish 76th and 24th individually, for the 9-year-olds; 13:05.36. Abel Arana was the Strider’s first runner to cross the finish line in the field of 137 runners. His time was 11:45.85, placing 39th overall and 28th individually, for the 10-year-olds. Abel and his teammates also ran away with a 3rd place podium title. This division ran the 3,000-meter race (1.86 mile) race.

The last race for our athletes, was the girls 7 and 8-year-olds. Following in her brother’s footsteps, Itzel Arana also was the Strider’s number one runner to cross the finish line with a PR time of 9:18.30. Itzel placed 32nd overall and 11th individually, for the 7-year-olds. Her teammate Natalia Retana had a huge PR time of 10:44.33, placing 51st overall and 31st individually, for the 8-year-olds. This was the girls first National experience and together with their teammates, Itzel and Natalia earned a 3rd place podium finish in their 2,000-meter (1.24 mile) race.

Fillmore Condors Cross Country is a non-profit organization under Heritage Valley Blazers Inc. We are the only cross-country team in Fillmore, we represent our city with pride. The Condors are coached by Philip Ramirez, Gerardo Flores, Jared Perez and Felix Zuniga. “Saying we are proud, is an understatement; especially this year. We had an unpredictable season and made the best of it. All we wanted was some normalcy for our athletes, and running has always taken us places. They come out, push through the pain, and train their minds daily with one goal in mind; December!” Condors President Erika Arana and board members would like to thank the following for sponsoring our athletes this unforgettable cross-country season: Fillmore Lions Club, Fillmore Rotary Club, Prancer’s Farm, Siena Floral Accent’s, Heritage Valley Blazers Inc. and the Fillmore Community for purchasing Jamba Juice cards from our athletes. For more XC or Track info, contact 805-624-1129. FOREVER CONDORS!

 

The State of California’s Stay Home Order will go into effect on Sunday, December 6 at 11:59 pm in Ventura County and in all Counties in Southern California, after the Southern California Region's hospital ICU capacity dropped below 15%. The order closes many businesses and activities and urges people to stay at home whenever possible.

The California Department of Public Health reported on Friday evening that Southern California's ICU capacity dropped to 13.1%, triggering the Stay Home Order.

The order requires bars, wineries, nail salons, hair salons and barbershops, and other personal care services to close. Private gatherings of any size are prohibited. Restaurants can stay open for takeout and delivery, but they have to shut down both indoor and outdoor dining.

The Southern California Region Ventura County was placed in has, by itself, more than half the State’s total population. The region includes 11 counties. The County is urging the Governor to consider smaller, more targeted regions. The County, along with 58 Counties throughout the State, are also urging the Governor to consider additional, immediate assistance for impacted workers, families and businesses. The County of Ventura will continue to advocate and engage with the State on behalf of our County on a regular basis.

Schools opened while Ventura County was in the purple tier can stay open. K-6 schools that were given a waiver to reopen will be allowed to stay open. Retail stores will be allowed to stay open at 20% capacity.

Additionally, all non-essential travel is temporarily restricted statewide. Hotels and motels are now restricted to guests traveling for an essential reason.

Ventura County and all Counties in the Southern California Region are required by the State to stay under the lockdown for at least three weeks. After that, state health officials will evaluate ICU capacity and transmission rates to project at least four weeks into the future to determine if the stay home order can be lifted.

All Ventura County residents are further urged to help slow the spread by wearing a mask, social distancing and not gathering during this critical time. “Given the significant increase we have been experiencing in our county with COVID-19 with cases, test positivity, and hospitalizations, this order is the only remaining measure to flatten the curve as soon as possible,” said Rigoberto Vargas, Ventura County Public Health Director.

“Since it will take several weeks for these additional restrictions to slow in particular the very concerning rising hospitalizations, collectively and as the strong community that Ventura County is known for, I urge every resident and sector to support the measure in this order so that we can once and for all, given also the upcoming COVID-19 vaccine, get this virus under control. We will then be able to return to the path toward fully opening our business, schools and other sectors,” added Vargas.

The following activities and sectors must close by midnight on Sunday, December 6:
Indoor and outdoor playgrounds
Indoor recreational facilities
Hair salons and barbershops
Personal care services
Museums, zoos, and aquariums
Movie theaters
Wineries
Bars, breweries and distilleries
Family entertainment centers
Cardrooms and satellite wagering
Limited services
Live audience sports
Amusement parks

Other sectors that will be allowed to stay open when operating remotely is not possible include:
Critical Infrastructure
Schools that are already open for in-person learning
Non-urgent medical and dental care
Childcare and pre-K

The following sectors will have additional modifications in addition to 100% masking and physical distancing:
• Outdoor recreational facilities: Allow outdoor operation only without any food, drink or alcohol sales. Additionally, overnight stays at campgrounds will not be permitted.
• Retail: Allow indoor operation at 20% capacity with entrance metering and no eating or drinking in the stores. Additionally, special hours should be instituted for seniors and others with chronic conditions or compromised immune systems.
• Shopping centers: Allow indoor operation at 20% capacity with entrance metering and no eating or drinking in the stores. Additionally, special hours should be instituted for seniors and others with chronic conditions or compromised immune systems.
• Hotels and lodging: Allow to open for critical infrastructure support only.
• Restaurants: Allow only for take-out, pick-up, or delivery. No indoor or outdoor dining.
• Offices: Allow remote only except for critical infrastructure sectors where remote working is not possible.
• Places of worship and political expression: Allow outdoor services only.
• Entertainment production including professional sports: Allow operation without live audiences. Additionally, testing protocol and “bubbles” are highly encouraged.

More information about the Stay Home Order can be found at: https://covid19.ca.gov/stay-home-except-for-essential-needs/

Local information at www.venturacountyrecovers.org.