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Photos by Bob Crum.
Photos by Bob Crum.
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On Tuesday, July 16th at 3:53pm, at 186 East Telegraph Road, near the El Dorado Mobile Park, there was a two car collision involving a white mid-size SUV and a blue pickup truck, that was hauling an additional vehicle. Cause of the crash still under investigation.
On Tuesday, July 16th at 3:53pm, at 186 East Telegraph Road, near the El Dorado Mobile Park, there was a two car collision involving a white mid-size SUV and a blue pickup truck, that was hauling an additional vehicle. Cause of the crash still under investigation.
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13 ‘Neighborhoods for Learning, Powered by Interface’ locations will serve as early education hubs and resource centers for local children and families

First 5 Ventura County (F5VC) is pleased to join Interface Children & Family Services (ICFS) in announcing 13 Neighborhoods for Learning (NfL) locations scheduled to open in late August. Services will be provided across the county with locations in Camarillo, Fillmore, Moorpark, Oxnard, Port Hueneme, Santa Paula, Simi Valley, Thousand Oaks, and Ventura. The sites will help provide essential learning opportunities and services for Ventura County’s nearly 60,000 children prenatal – 5 and their families.

This announcement marks another milestone achieved as part of F5VC’s newly redesigned NfL model. First 5 Ventura County will be investing $2.9 million annually in the First 5 Neighborhoods for Learning, powered by Interface, with classes beginning in late August and early September
2019.

“We are committed to continue delivering Parent and Child Together (PACT) Classes and family support services throughout the county and in neighborhoods where our most vulnerable families and young children reside,” said First 5 Ventura County Executive Director Petra Puls. “Together with ICFS, we have thoroughly reviewed and selected 13 easily accessible locations to serve as neighborhood hubs for early learning and family support services. Many of the sites are in familiar locations, like schools.”

The centrally located NfL locations will offer programs including Parent and Child Together (PACT) classes to help parents and caregivers enhance their knowledge of child development and positive parenting practices to support their children’s learning and development. Parent education classes provide a venue for parents to connect with peers and benefit from social support. Families will also have access to developmental screenings, assistance with care coordination and referral to services such as housing, dental, and Cal Fresh programs.

"We're excited to partner with F5VC in establishing these prime NfL locations,” said Interface Executive Director Erik Sternad. “The carefully selected NfL sites will allow us to work collaboratively to ensure our Ventura County children and families are served in the best and most cost-effective manner possible.”

The award winning First 5 Neighborhoods for Learning were founded nearly 20 years ago with the understanding that parents and caregivers are the foundation of children's well-being and healthy development. Years of research confirms that a child’s brain develops faster from birth to age three than at any other later period in life, building the foundation for a child's future learning, behavior, and health. “A child’s experiences in the first three years are the bricks and mortar of brain development, which is why we’ve updated the NfL model and placed an even greater emphasis on PACT classes” remarked Elizabeth Majestic, Pritzker Fellow and First 5 Director of Neighborhoods for Learning.

“To help us best serve the families with young children, F5VC and ICFS will be hosting a series of local open house events in early August offering opportunities for parents to enroll in classes and engage with the community,” said Puls. “We hope our neighbors will come out and explore all we have to offer and meet our NfL staff.”

The first of these events will be on Tuesday, August 13 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Justin Early Learner Academy in Simi Valley and Sespe Elementary in Fillmore. All those interested in joining the F5VC and ICFS family to learn more about classes and programs are encouraged to drop by.

Additional locations will be announced in the next few weeks. To view a current list of locations and open house opportunities, please visit www.First5Ventura.org

About First 5 Ventura County
Research shows that a child’s brain develops most dramatically in the first five years and what parents and caregivers do during these years to support their child’s growth will have a significant impact throughout life. Based on this research, First 5 Ventura County was created by voters in 1998 to invest Ventura County’s allocation of funds from California’s voter-approved Proposition 10 tax 50 cents-per-pack tax on tobacco. F5VC invests these revenues in programs and services for children prenatal - 5 that support children’s health, early learning, and strong families, including our nationally recognized Neighborhoods for Learning (NfLs).

First 5 Ventura County knows that improving the life trajectory of our youngest children will not be the product of Prop 10 funds alone, which now average $160 per child under the age of 5 in each county. Changing systems and policies to prioritize children at the earliest moments in their lives is what’s required to help all children have the best start possible in life.

About Interface Children & Family Services
Interface is Ventura County’s leading nonprofit social services agency, providing free, proven, and responsive services to address the complex physical and emotional needs of 59,000 local clients every year. Its 30 programs utilize 10 evidence-based practices to serve children, teens, adults and families who are typically low-income and struggling with poverty, domestic violence, human trafficking, homelessness, incarceration, child abuse, neglect and abandonment. Interface also connects 150,000 clients per year to a vast network of health and human services in 19 counties through its 2-1-1 Information and Referral program.

Interface’s core program areas are Mental Health and Trauma Treatment, Domestic Violence Intervention and Child Abuse Prevention, Youth Crisis and Homeless Services, Human Trafficking Intervention, Reentry Services, Early Childhood Family Development, and 2-1-1 information and referral. The agency has pioneered several programs including launching California’s first 2-1-1 call center, initiated Ventura County’s Pay for Success Program, and was one of the first agencies in the state to open a domestic violence shelter. Recently, Interface opened the only human trafficking shelter for adults, and is the only provider of child abuse treatment in the region. The agency operates out of five main locations including Camarillo, Moorpark, Oxnard, Santa Paula and Thousand Oaks, and soon, will be providing early education and parent support at an additional thirteen First 5 Neighborhoods for Learning Powered by Interface sites. For more information, please contact Catherine L. Kort at ckort@icfs.org or (805) 206-8663.

 


 
Photo of the Week "My favorite Chevy at the Sespe Creek Car Show" By Bob Crum. [Bob says "Note the sunstars on the chrome! Irresistible photo op!" Photo data: Canon 7DMKII, manual mode, Tamron 16-300mm lens @35mm. Exposure; ISO 1000, aperture f/25, 1/250 second shutter speed.
Photo of the Week "My favorite Chevy at the Sespe Creek Car Show" By Bob Crum. [Bob says "Note the sunstars on the chrome! Irresistible photo op!" Photo data: Canon 7DMKII, manual mode, Tamron 16-300mm lens @35mm. Exposure; ISO 1000, aperture f/25, 1/250 second shutter speed.
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It's Complicated
Bob Crum
Bob Crum

It's reported that planet earth, and the universe, was created in darkness. Not satisfied, God said: Let there be light! Thomas Edison, not one to argue with a higher authority, promptly invented the light bulb. And the Lord was pleased saying: Light is good but more is better, and the sun was born.

Without light, photography couldn't exist. But what is light? Paraphrasing BBC.com: "Einstein suggested that light is carried in tiny quantum packets. Each quantum packs a discrete energy punch that relates to the wavelength: the shorter the wavelength, the denser the energy punch. A brighter light source delivers more light packets, but doesn't change the amount of energy each light packet contains.

Furthermore, Einstein named these energy packets 'photons', now recognized as particles which carry visible light. At this point, physicists decided to end the debate over whether light behaved as a wave or a particle. Both models were so convincing that neither could be rejected. To end the confusion of non-physicists, the scientists decided that light behaved as both waves and particles at the same time: A paradox.

While we take sunlight for granted, photons often wreak havoc. While the human eye can discern differing brightness levels, not so even for the most advanced cameras. Camera sensors bombarded with variations of photons often get confused. Hence, white balance not always correct, not to mention exposure. Challenges prevail.

However, understanding light will significantly improve your photography. For example, different types of natural light can also produce a wide variety of subject appearances, even though these all have the same light source: The sun. Three factors influence how natural light renders a subject: Time of day, camera direction and weather.

Cambridge in Colour explains: From sunlight, a subject's illumination is comprised of several components: Direct sunlight (warmer, high contrast) diffuse skylight (cooler, low contrast) and bounced light (reflective light). The time of day complicates matters because the kind of light affects white balance and/or contrast. Besides the time of day, the extent of cloud cover significantly varies the type of light. As I said, light is complicated.

To beat the throng, I was ready at 8 a.m. to shoot the car show. Not so fast. The marine layer (clouds) was thicker than cold yogurt. Under the clouds, the light was softer than room temperature rose petals. Soft light is fine for mermaid boudoir photography, but not for classic vehicles. I prefer sunlight to reflect the rich, gorgeous colors. Furthermore, without sunlight no sunstars.

About noon, with the marine layer beginning to break up, it was time to go. OMG, the throng became a super-sized crowd. Oh my, look at the luscious Chevy - excuse me sir - I'd like to photography that car. Yes sir, you are in my way. Scuse me ma'am, I'd like to photograph that car - yes, you are in my way. Wish I had a dollar for every person that walked in front of my camera! Ugh!

Anyway, so many fantabulous classic vehicles it was a gold mine of photo ops. But cars parked side-by-side made it challenging to get the desired perspective. Did the best I could considering the circumstances. Remember, it's not nice to ask how many photos I shot.
Oh, and when the sun moved towards the western sky, hallelujah! You know I can't resist a few shots of cars with sunstars? Remember, in addition to kind of light, the time of day is equally important. Hear me?

The photo of the week is the black Chevy at the car show, complete with multiple sunstars on the chrome. Happy photoing!

Send comments, suggestions or questions to: focusonphotography@earthlink.net

 

Recovery continues for California communities impacted by the Camp, Hill and Woolsey wildfires, which all started November 8, 2018. FEMA has now approved $76,755,681 to reimburse the State for emergency protective measures performed by the California Department of Forestry and Fire (Cal Fire) for costs associated with battling last November’s wildfires under FEMA’s Public Assistance Program. This brings the total amount of federal assistance to more than $163 million; additional projects will continue to be funded.

FEMA funds will be used to reimburse the department for such endeavors as firefighting, traffic control (barricading), search and rescue, air attack fire suppression, and operating a mobile communications center during the three wildfires which started November 8, 2018 in Butte, Ventura and Los Angeles counties.

The grant is funded by FEMA’s Public Assistance Program, an essential source of funding for communities recovering from a federally declared disaster or emergency. The California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (CalOES) works with FEMA during all phases of the program and conducts final reviews of FEMA-approved projects.

Applicants work directly with FEMA to develop projects and scope of work. FEMA obligates funding for the project after its final approval.

Once a project is obligated by FEMA, CalOES works closely with the applicant to finalize the grant and begin making payments. CalOES has implemented new procedures designed to ensure grant funding is provided to local communities as quickly as possible.

FEMA’s Public Assistance Program provides grants to state, tribal, and local governments, and certain types of private non-profit organizations, including houses of worship, so that communities can quickly respond to and recover from major disasters or emergencies.

 
 
At last night’s city council meeting a representative from the Ventura County Fair unveiled the winner of the 10th Annual Ventura Country Fair Poster Contest, Daríanna Vásquez of Santa Paula.
At last night’s city council meeting a representative from the Ventura County Fair unveiled the winner of the 10th Annual Ventura Country Fair Poster Contest, Daríanna Vásquez of Santa Paula.
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8-A Council approved the response to the Grand Jury findings and recommendations, and submit the response to the Presiding Judge of the Superior Court for the annual detention report.

8-B Resolution 19-3726 creating the unrepresented part-time classifications of Volunteer Fire Assistant Chief (temporary coverage), Volunteer Fire Battalion Chief and Volunteer Fire Engineer and adopting job descriptions for these positions was approved.

8-C City Council approved amending Resolution No. 14-3439 to add the part-time positions of Volunteer Fire Assistant Chief (Temporary Coverage), Volunteer Fire Battalion Chief, and Volunteer Fire Engineer, as well as the daily rate per 24-hour shift for these positions. The daily rate changes set forth in Salary Schedule “T” will be retroactively effective to July 1, 2019.

8-D That the City Council adopt Resolution 19-3724 Approving and Adopting the City of Fillmore’s Revised Publicly Available Pay Schedule to reflect the July 1, 2019, Fire Department volunteer staff additions and pay rate changes.

8-E It was approved that City Council members serve as official representatives of the City to various intergovernmental agencies. The League of California Cities allows each Member City to vote at the Annual Business Meeting. Council members, Mayor Diane McCall, Mark Austin, and Tim Holmgren were appointed.

8-F The following was approved: that the City Council: 1. Find that this action is categorically exempt from CEQA pursuant to Section 15061(b)(3) of the CEQA Guidelines; and 2. Approve the introduction and first reading of Ordinance No. 913 amending the Fillmore Municipal Code to allow covenants for easements.

8-G The City Council, as the Successor Agency to the Redevelopment Agency Directors, approved the updated month to month leases for the Theatre Storefront properties at 336 and 338 B Central Avenue, Fillmore, California.

8-H It was approved, that the City Council, as the Successor Agency Board of Directors: 1. Approve the attached First Amendment to the Purchase and Sale Agreement for Successor Agency property located at 510 Santa Clara Street; and 2. Direct staff to submit the First Amendment to the Purchase and Sale Agreement to the County Oversight Board for approval and authorize the Agency’s Chair to execute the agreement after Oversight Board approval.

8-I City Council, as the Successor Agency Board of Directors: 1. Approved the attached First Amendment to the Purchase and Sale Agreement for Successor Agency property located at 510 Santa Clara Street; and 2. Direct staff to submit the First Amendment to the Purchase and Sale Agreement to the County Oversight Board for approval and authorized the Agency’s Chair to execute the agreement after Oversight Board approval.

 
The Fillmore Lions Club recently recognized three members for the multiple club awards. Pictured (l-r) is Stephen McKeown, “Lifetime Achievement Award” recipient, Lion’s District Representative Bill Dunlevy (award presenter), Lion’s District Representative Margaret Dunlevy (award presenter), Eddi Barajas “Don Snyder Award” recipient, and Jaclyn Ibarra “Lion of the Year” award recipient. Photo courtesy Jan Lee.
The Fillmore Lions Club recently recognized three members for the multiple club awards. Pictured (l-r) is Stephen McKeown, “Lifetime Achievement Award” recipient, Lion’s District Representative Bill Dunlevy (award presenter), Lion’s District Representative Margaret Dunlevy (award presenter), Eddi Barajas “Don Snyder Award” recipient, and Jaclyn Ibarra “Lion of the Year” award recipient. Photo courtesy Jan Lee.
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Courtesy Jan Lee

Recently, the Fillmore Lion’s Club took the time to honor members of their local Club. Member Jaclyn Ibarra earned the “Lion of the Year” which is given to the Fillmore member who has done the most for the local community. Ms. Ibarra has been active in almost all the community activities this year. Her enthusiasm and good nature is contagious!

The second award given was for service above and beyond was Eddi Barajas, current president of Fillmore Lion’s Club. Mr. Barajas received the “Don Snyder Award.” One of the Lion’s Club’s community projects is the Youth Speaker contest; Mr. Barajas spent hours and hours working to coordinate this contest on top of the time he spent as Club President. The young speakers and local members appreciate his outstanding efforts.

The third awarded was to Stephen McKeown who earned the “Lifetime Achievement Award.” Like the other two recipients, Mr. McKeown stays busy working on projects that help the Fillmore community. Over many years, he has been available to work toward any and all Lion’s Club projects. Fillmore residents have benefitted greatly by the efforts of these three dedicated people. When you see them around town, congratulate them and thank them for their service. The awards were presented by Lion’s District Representatives Margaret and Bill Dunlevy.